sociolinguistics

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sociolinguistics

[-ling·gwis′tiks]
the study of the relationship between language and the social context in which it occurs. sociolinguistic, adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
From a verbal behavior perspective, Kohlenberg and Tsai (1991) show how this preference over extended periods of time could become part of a larger functional unit, such as what is commonly called "self" or what sociolinguists identify as part of the individual and group identity (Ben-Rafael, 1994).
664, Note 18) 'change' refers to innovation (which is possible in any environment because of discontinuity of transmission), not to diffusion of the innovation, as sociolinguists understand it.
Sociolinguist Nancy Dorian notes, "Minority groups are known all too often and easily to adopt majority attitudes toward themselves, even when these are hostile, in the absence of countervailing forces" (Dorian 1981: 28-29).
The author of the book under review takes a fairly wide view of the subject of gender communication: at one time she is a sociolinguist, while at other times she takes an educator's stance.
Yuling Pan is a sociolinguist affiliated with the US Census Bureau; Daniel Z.
However, Italian sociolinguist Arturo Tosi once stated that "multiculturalism cannot be genuinely achieved without an adequate policy of multilingualism" (1984, p.
As the sociolinguist Dell Hymes points out, "an etic account, however useful as a preliminary grid and input to an emic (structural) account, and as framework for comparing different emic accounts, lacks the emic account's validity" (Foundations 11).
The sociolinguistic discussions that encompass the core of the research seem methodologically loosely connected to the presentation of the Egyptian evidence, but perhaps the sociolinguist will see more clearly how the ancient Egyptian examples illustrate and support current sociolinguistic theory.
While statements that a typical user makes about his language do not necessarily coincide with actual practice, they often do - as sociolinguist Harold Schiffman has pointed out: "beliefs .
Eminent sociolinguist William Labov and two colleagues, Sharon Ash and Charles Boberg, first present thorough information about the goals and methods of the study, including the questions asked in 762 telephone interviews.
And while sociolinguists were well-grounded in social theory, researchers like William Labov focused on particular socioeconomic groups and their contrasting patterns of pronunciation and language use, not the paralinguistic aspects like interruptions and overlaps that bring conversations to life.
To date, research by sociolinguists and sociologists has shown that there is still some way to go before a foreign accent becomes a neutral or socially unmarked feature that does not attract negative stereotyping.