sociogenic


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sociogenic

(sō′sē-ō-jĕn′ĭk, -shē-)
adj.
1. Arising from or imposed by society.
2. Motivated by social influences, values, or constraints.

sociogenic

[-jen′ik]
Etymology: L, socius + Gk, genesis, origin
pertaining to personal or group activities that are motivated by social values and constraints.
References in periodicals archive ?
Such responses, according to Wynter, are "only a function (a map), if an indispensible one, of the enacted institutionalization of our present genre of the human, Man and its governing sociogenic code (the territory).
Due to this likelihood of mass panic and sociogenic illness, school counselors must respond immediately to a bioterrorist incident in their own school.
Not only does the media have a fundamental responsibility to correctly inform its watchers, listeners and readers - in extreme cases, misconceptions can lead even to mental illness such as Mass Sociogenic Illness (MSI); recognised by psychiatrists as a condition triggered by media hype.
I want to give credit to Maggie Kuhn who warned us not to accept what she termed sociogenic aging--being assigned roles as nonpersons, relegating people to playpens and warehouses.
He and colleagues at the University of Leuven believe many features of the outbreak point to mass sociogenic illness - MSI.
Racism, likewise, might be sociogenic rather than phylogenic -- "homologous with gender and class oppression.
Good (1976) attributes special importance to the social factor in the use of soft drugs, labeling it sociogenic or cultogenic.
Theorizing the black body from this location critiques an ontogenic perspective and raises the issue of the sociogenic.