sociogenic


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sociogenic

(sō′sē-ō-jĕn′ĭk, -shē-)
adj.
1. Arising from or imposed by society.
2. Motivated by social influences, values, or constraints.

sociogenic

[-jen′ik]
Etymology: L, socius + Gk, genesis, origin
pertaining to personal or group activities that are motivated by social values and constraints.
References in periodicals archive ?
After examining these difficulties of sovereign marronage, he turns his attention to sociogenic marronage.
The sociogenic imperative of typography: A "face" for the new South Africa.
Ron Chamberlain, then Kirkby-in-Ashfield Council environmental health committee chairman, also backed the "mass sociogenic illness" conclusion.
In this sense, the psychopathological circumstances (chronic alcoholism, drug addictions, psychopathies, reactive states), somatogenic circumstances (birth defects, disabilities, severe, incurable somatic diseases) and sociogenic circumstances (proselytism, social and legal conflicts, sociopathies) should be considered.
Such responses, according to Wynter, are "only a function (a map), if an indispensible one, of the enacted institutionalization of our present genre of the human, Man and its governing sociogenic code (the territory).
This particular conjunction of sociogenic and psychogenic processes signals the advent of a "civilizing process" that has no pre-determined end, but moves along in a patterned dynamic sequence of "spurts and counter-spurts" (Elias [1939]/2000: 382).
Evolution of the human fear-circuitry and acute sociogenic pseudoneurological symptoms: the Neolithic balanced-polymorphism hypothesis.
Mass sociogenic illness--that is, the rapid spread of psychosomatic symptoms in a group due to hysteria--occurred on September 29, 2001, when 16 middle school students and a teacher went to a hospital because they mistook paint fumes for bioterrorism (Wessely, Hyams, & Bartholomew, 2001).
In any case these strong sociogenic ties put a brake on extreme creative approaches, radicalism and artism.
Not only does the media have a fundamental responsibility to correctly inform its watchers, listeners and readers - in extreme cases, misconceptions can lead even to mental illness such as Mass Sociogenic Illness (MSI); recognised by psychiatrists as a condition triggered by media hype.
I want to give credit to Maggie Kuhn who warned us not to accept what she termed sociogenic aging--being assigned roles as nonpersons, relegating people to playpens and warehouses.
He and colleagues at the University of Leuven believe many features of the outbreak point to mass sociogenic illness - MSI.