sociobiology

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sociobiology

 [so″se-o-bi-ol´ah-je]
the branch of theoretical biology that proposes that animal (including human) behavior has a biological basis controlled by the genes. adj., adj sociobiolog´ical.

sociobiology

/so·cio·bi·ol·o·gy/ (so″se-o-bi-ol´ah-je) the branch of theoretical biology that proposes that animal (including human) behavior has a biological basis controlled by the genes.sociobiolog´icsociobiolog´ical

sociobiology

(sō′sē-ō-bī-ŏl′ə-jē, -shē-)
n.
The study of the biological determinants of social behavior, based on the theory that such behavior is often genetically transmitted and subject to evolutionary processes.

so′ci·o·bi′o·log′i·cal (-bī′ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
so′ci·o·bi·ol′o·gist n.

sociobiology

[sō′sē·ō′bī·ol′əjē]
Etymology: L, socius, companion; Gk, bios, life, logos, science
the systematic study of biology as a basis for human behavior. Proponents contend that disease, stress, and aggression are natural pressures for maintaining an optimal level of population.

sociobiology

the explanation of social behaviour in terms of evolutionary theory
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References in periodicals archive ?
The last area in particular, which highlights the whole issue of human motivation and intention, is something that many, if not most, sociobiologists appear almost to take for granted.
The above distinction is an important one because the variables that govern phylogenetic change may not be the same as those responsible for ontogenetic change, and the sociobiologist, well-suited to entertain the former, is less inclined to reflect upon the latter.
Almost as easy to explain, at least for sociobiologists, is "nepotism" - cooperating with kin.
For example, sociobiologists have used our supposed descent from hunters to support a genetic basis for human behaviors such as aggression and certain gender roles -- men bringing home the food, women tied to domestic chores.
Even though some criticism is deserved, the work of criminologists and sociobiologists does, in his opinion, offer insight into the behavior of past criminals.
The sociobiologists have taken this stream of thought further.
In his second Natural Images essay, Mirowski insightfully argues that when sociobiologists developed a potential rival to microeconomics in the 1970s, economists responded with animal experiments.
Although not proven, sociobiologists believe that such tendencies have a biological basis.
Drawing on the work of distinguished sociobiologists, Mr.
Rex Stanford, however, observes that the communication of danger to a close relative may promote the survival of one's own genes through the mechanism of kinship selection, as proposed by the sociobiologists.
According to many sociobiologists, mating practices are the result of an evolutionary process favoring genes that most successfully replicate themselves.
General statements about women on account of biology, have largely been challenged by a number of sociobiologists.