society

(redirected from societies)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to societies: Secret societies, Building societies

society

(sə-sī′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. socie·ties
1.
a. The totality of people regarded as forming a community of interdependent individuals: working for the benefit of society.
b. A group of people broadly distinguished from other groups by mutual interests, participation in characteristic relationships, shared institutions, and a common culture: rural society; literary society.
2. An organization or association of persons engaged in a common profession, activity, or interest: a folklore society; a society of bird watchers.
3. The wealthy, socially dominant members of a community. Also called high society.
4. Companionship; company: enjoys the society of friends and family members.
5. Biology A colony or community of organisms, usually of the same species: an insect society.

society

[səsī′ətē]
a nation, community, or broad group of people who establish particular aims, beliefs, or standards of living and conduct.

Patient discussion about society

Q. Why is it so hip to be thin and fit???? not everyone can be as thin and as fit as the society demands? was it always like that ? because i feel like if you are gaining a little extra pounds you are doomed !!! people condem you as a less better man in the good case .. in the worst case you won't have friends ....

A. i think that the in the biological way of thinking - people are attracted to what seems healthy, it has more chance of giving healthy child that will survive. in African cultures that food is scarce- being big considered to be healthy and attractive. in our culture- being over weight means unhealthy, but so is too skinny. so going back and forth with a few ponds is fine. but the two extreme situations are unattractive for most men.

Q. What do you think is the most serious nutritional issue facing us in an industrialized society today? I am very careful about taking care of my health. I never ever left my stomach empty. I always eat a nutritional diet. I am staying away from parents to support their financial needs. So I take more care with my health. If I am in good health then my family will be healthy. I often do a lot of research regarding my diet. I am very careful about that. If you are a dietician, please tell me what do you think is the most serious nutritional issue facing us in an industrialized society today?

A. PS...THE DYE IN FOOD....has been linked to cancer.

Q. Is this a malady if i am homosexual? because i feel sometimes very unhappy and outside the society... Some people would say - "oh yes", other could say: "i don't know, but i think this is not so common or normal", "homosexual? even the rats don't do it in the laboratories", "they should be exterminated", and so on. In fact we hear probably more bad stuff, than something else. My brother is homosexual and was very long depressive, because he could not tell it to our parents. Perhaps he is still depressive - a little bit from time to time. He lives with his partner. I do not pretend to have the key about it, nor the why nor the "how it comes". I share here with you what I have been taught some years ago. I can live with that. It makes for me sense. I know that many of you will not agree with it, but as long we have not a better explanation...

A. I've worked with different gay people, open and in the closet. I have nothing but good experiences with them. I have never had a talk with them regarding their bring up or how they discovered they were gay.

More discussions about society
References in classic literature ?
There were owners of lines of schooners, large contributors to the societies, and small men, their few craft pawned to the mastheads, with bankers and marine-insurance agents, captains of tugs and water-boats, riggers, fitters, lumpers, salters, boat-builders, and coopers, and all the mixed population of the water-front.
True, he knew the wonderful walled city of Lahore from the Delhi Gate to the outer Fort Ditch; was hand in glove with men who led lives stranger than anything Haroun al Raschid dreamed of; and he lived in a life wild as that of the Arabian Nights, but missionaries and secretaries of charitable societies could not see the beauty of it.
It was with a sense of luxury that he recognized his power of viewing life here from its inner side, in a way that had been quite foreign to him in his student-days; and, much as he loved his parents, he could not help being aware that to come here, as now, after an experience of home-life, affected him like throwing off splints and bandages; even the one customary curb on the humours of English rural societies being absent in this place, Talbothays having no resident landlord.
That was how women with lovers lived in the wicked old societies, in apartments with all the rooms on one floor, and all the indecent propinquities that their novels described.
Thus, the doctor had become well known to the public, although he could not claim membership in either of the Royal Geographical Societies of London, Paris, Berlin, Vienna, or St.
All the papers, pamphlets, reports-- all the journals published by the scientific, literary, and religious societies enlarged upon its advantages; and the Society of Natural History of Boston, the Society of Science and Art of Albany, the Geographical and Statistical Society of New York, the Philosophical Society of Philadelphia, and the Smithsonian of Washington sent innumerable letters of congratulation to the Gun Club, together with offers of immediate assistance and money.
Count of the Holy Roman Empire, Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Brazen Crown, Perpetual Arch-Master of the Rosicrucian Masons of Mesopotamia; Attached (in Honorary Capacities) to Societies Musical, Societies Medical, Societies Philosophical, and Societies General Benevolent, throughout Europe; etc.
March 31, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (PHMC) has awarded more than $1,900,000 in grants to 120 eligible museums and official county historical societies in Pennsylvania that met the following criteria:
Twenty-one states had formed accounting societies, associations, or institutes by 1910, and that wave of development continued through the 1920s and 1930s.
Simon Cordery's examination of British friendly societies is a long-overdue look into the origins, operations, social significance, and ultimately, decline and demise of one of the most significant contributions to nineteenth century economic, social development in liberal and industrial Great Britain.
Two large and well-established societies, The Endocrine Society and the Society for Endocrinology, serve the practitioners of this field.
Furthermore, they naturally gravitated toward agriculture and a subsequent desire to become slave-holding societies.

Full browser ?