social sanctions

social sanctions

the measures used by a society to enforce its rules of acceptable behavior.
References in periodicals archive ?
ISLAMABAD -- President Mamnoon Hussain has said that corruption is one of the major hurdles in social development and economic prosperity and stressed the need for accountability of the corrupt by application of law and social sanctions.
In two multi-part studies, the PI investigated the economic forces underlying the religious provision of social insurance, social sanctions, social conservatism, and the economic incentives that give rise to gender violence, sexual harassment, and regulation of the private domain.
Electronic cigarettes are the number one alternative nicotine source for those looking to switch from dirty traditional cigarettes with their well-known drawbacks and social sanctions.
ySTANBUL (CyHAN)- Social sanctions will be necessary alongside legal measures if domestic violence is to be curbed in Turkey, according to experts from a number of fields who gathered at a conference of the Journalists and Writers Foundation (GYV) in ystanbul on Sunday, marking the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women.
Indeed in the most dramatic case examined, which involves sorcery accusations leveled at a man with a prestigious job overseas, a public attempt at denying the gossip and confronting the gossipers, ends in further social sanctions for the accused, which are justified by the fact that he angrily denied the initial accusations of his misdeeds.
Community based groups were empowered "to establish systems of fines, taunting or social sanctions to punish those who continued to defecate in the open," the report said.
Islamic law grants land rights to women, but in daily life the threat of divorce or other social sanctions encourage women to cede practical control of their land to men.
Islamic law grants land rights to women, but in daily life, the threat of divorce or other social sanctions encourage women to give up practical control of their land to men.
Sociologists and social psychologists widely acknowledge that individuals' decisions are not only governed by their material payoffs but also influenced by nonmaterial social payoffs that arise in the decision makers' social environment, for example, in the form of social approval of social sanctions, as argued, for example, by Asch (1951) or Coleman (1990).
In this process, people who wish to engage in an activity that carries social sanctions do so in a place where they are immune to the real effects of those sanctions.
Melungeons are a group of people in the Appalachian Mountains who for centuries sought to evade legal and social sanctions against their racially mixed heritage by telling various tales of their exotic origins.
Single-earner families would face less economic pressure, and employers would probably be able to favor male breadwinners without facing legal or social sanctions.

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