social relatedness

social relatedness

Interpersonal intimacy; empathy; shared subjectivity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Social relatedness is a natural need by human beings to belong to a group, be accepted and feel positive emotions while acting as a group member (Deci and Ryan, 2000).
Social relatedness or connection, however, is a basic human need, promoting better health outcomes, signaling a positive outlook for the future, and supporting resilience.
From Kanner's (1943) original conceptualization to the most recent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR), problems in social relatedness have been a characteristic of the disorder.
There existed a fundamentally distinctive field of family relations and social relatedness, which remained unacknowledged in the official procedures and practices, which penetrate the most intimate aspects of social life.
Lebanon and Syria share special ties, joint borders, historical and social relatedness," Minister Daouk said and noted that the Lebanese decision of disassociation served in preserving stability.
46) In either case, natural selection produced the cognitive processes necessary for social relatedness, and at least some of these processes were used for the purpose of developing a relationship with the transcendent or God.
The study examines the extent to which each media activity meets individuals' needs for competence, autonomy and social relatedness, and how meeting these needs may motivate engagement in the activity.
Traditional suicide risk factors in mid-life include social estrangement, as exemplified by the SADPERSONS suicide mnemonic, which subsumes 10 risk factors, several of which are direct or indirect measures of social relatedness.
Although no medication has yet been shown effective for the core symptom domains of autism, there are "glimmers of hope with respect to social relatedness," Dr.
That is, many of the models felt relatively unfulfilled in their need for social relatedness (the need to feel connected with others), their need for autonomy (feeling free to make independent decisions) and their need for competence (the need to feel skilled and effective rather than incompetent in one's daily activities).
Results similar to those in Sprintball's research were found, with students receiving the special reflection component making greater advances on all three dimensions of adolescent identity formation (agency, social relatedness, and moral-political awareness) than the other two groups.
Living with Autism, a multimedia CD, depicted in Autism Labyrinth draws parallels between the inner autist drama as the reliving of the ancient Greek Labyrinth myth causing difficulties affecting communication, social relatedness, and sensory processing.