social power

social power

Social medicine The influence–ie, power that a person has in society and among peers, attributable to expertise, information, or emulation by others. See Decision-making.
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Capital is, therefore, not a personal, it is a social power.
From the moment when labour can no longer be converted into capital, money, or rent, into a social power capable of being monopolised, i.
These things, doubtless, represent a great social power, but it is not the power of love; and no other power could win Philip from his personal reserve.
She could see him instantly before her, in every charm of air and address; but she could remember no more substantial good than the general approbation of the neighbourhood, and the regard which his social powers had gained him in the mess.
To be sure, he as invariably requested to be refreshed with a sight of the paper in which he was a joint proprietor; but he never failed to remark that it was the great pleasure he derived from Mr Venus's improving society which had insensibly lured him round to Clerkenwell again, and that, finding himself once more attracted to the spot by the social powers of Mr V.
He repressed with the utmost delicacy all betrayal of the shock which I am sure he must have received from our meeting, or of a desire to penetrate into my condition and circumstances, and sought by the utmost exertion of his charming social powers to make our reunion agreeable.
Prior research indicates that secondary schools present increased competition for positions of social power and fewer opportunities to express autonomy, compared with primary schools.
In his recent article in this journal "Epistemological Frameworks, Homosexuality, and Religion: How People of Faith Understand the Intersection between Homosexuality and Religion," David Hodge argued that Christians are disenfranchised both in the culture and in the social work profession because of the intellectual and social power of progressives, whom he described as including "gay men and lesbians, feminists, atheists, and metaphysical relativists" (2005, p.
His 25 books include Prejudice and Your Child (Wesleyan University Press; revised 2nd edition, 1988), the classic Dark Ghetto: Dilemmas of Social Power (Wesleyan University Press, 1989), A Possible Reality (Emerson Hall, 1972) and Pathos of Power (HarperCollins College Division, 1974).
and Bertram Raven developed a theory and model of social power that is used within businesses and organizations to this day.
In their classic article, "The Bases of Social Power," Raven and French (1959), describe the five bases of power: reward, coercive, legitimate, referent, and expert.
To the extent that the United States is a literary experiment, this is the nub of it: What happens when you give great wealth and social power to a group that had not been born into it?

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