social network


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social network

an interconnected group of cooperating significant others, who may or may not be related, with whom a person interacts.

social network

A group of individuals linked by behaviors (e.g., drug abuse), diseases (e.g., a cancer support group), hobbies or lifestyles (e.g., participation in sports or online friendships), family ties, or professions (e.g., nursing).
References in periodicals archive ?
Certainly it is nice to have friends, even virtual ones, and social networks seem to have reached the point of "critical mass" and are here to stay, at least until a new innovative use of the Web evolves.
The top social networks that the largest percentages of employees use are Facebook (95%), Twitter (43%), Google+ (37%), LinkedIn (37%), Pinterest (23%), MySpace (21%), and a personal blog (14%).
However, using social network identities for authentication may not suit all organizations.
Greater Facebook use was associated with a higher body-mass index, increased binge eating, a lower credit score, and higher levels of credit card debt for consumers with many close friends in their social network.
Finally, many social network users are not knowledgeable enough to differentiate between real and malicious entities.
Herbert Baines, Chief Security Information Office for the Georgia Institute of Technology, states "You must realize that with millions of people searching, looking for, and communicating with you on social network sites, you are very much alone and only you can protect your privacy and information.
Bolotaeva and Cata insist that social network sites are not yet ready to conduct direct e-commerce.
Summary: Over the years there has been an unprecedented rise in the use of online social networks.
Security professionals understand the risks of social networks better than anyone.
Users will be able to enjoy new social features faster and in more of the websites, web applications, and social networks they use.
Social network analysis, used throughout sociology, has surfaced as a method that helps explain interrelationships between actors (i.
In social network terms, the extent to which people in the network repeat or overlap is known as redundancy.