social facilitation


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social facilitation

the effects of the presence of an audience on a person's or team's performance. The term is a misnomer because the effects are not always facilitative and it has therefore been replaced with audience effects when the audience observes the activity but is not actively involved and coaction effects when the audience is concurrently engaged in the same activity.
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2010; Rhea, Landers, Alvar, & Arent, 2003; Rittenhouse, Salvy, & Barkley, 2011; Salvy et ah, 2009; Williams, Nida, Baca, & Latane, 1989; Wilmore, 1968) suggest a positive effect of the presence of others on physical activity behavior, which may be explained by the social facilitation and self presentation theories of Zajonc (1965) and Bond (1982).
The MSC assesses 12 common dimensions of motivation for both playing and watching, including self actualization (fulfilling one's potential), self esteem (holding oneself in high regard), value development (leaning important values), stress reduction (reducing tension), aesthetics (pursuing artistic aspects of sport), aggression (reducing aggression level), competition (enjoying being in competitive settings), risk taking (seeking thrill in sport), achievement (achieving a desired goal), social facilitation (spending more time with others), affiliation (associating oneself with a specific group), and skill mastery (enjoying difficult aspects of a particular sport).
Alcohol can still provide the social facilitation component that students want, which is a main reason why students drink in the first place.
As the motivation increased for the participants as in the social facilitation condition, so did their performance.
Social facilitation occurs when the presence of others enhances performance of simple, easily learned tasks.
Whereas social loafing and social facilitation have been empirically linked in past experiments, social loafing and deindividuation have not.
At the same time, the new work undercuts a competing theory, known as the social facilitation model, which contends that virgin female turtles randomly follow experienced breeders to a nesting site regardless of their birthplace.
One possible theoretical approach to explain these results is social facilitation (Zajonc, 1965; Cottrell, 1972).
In their meta-analysis of 241 social facilitation studies, Bond and Titus (1983) reported that numerous investigators found the presence of others to facilitate task performance (Allport, 1924; Dashiell, 1930; Travis, 1925; Triplett, 1897).
In addition, subjects performed the task without observers (with the exception of the experimenter) to minimize any influence of social facilitation on performance.
Mizruchi (1985) and Schwartz and Barsky (1977) interpreted audience effects through social facilitation theory with the social support of the audience being the main determinant of the home advantage.

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