social contract

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social contract

Medical practice The implied understanding between physician and Pt that the former provides the best possible care in a truthful and timely fashion, in exchange for the latter's trust. See Doctor-patient relationship.
References in periodicals archive ?
The American social compact reflects our distinctive political culture and institutional arrangements.
Another distinctive feature of the American social compact is the understanding and allocation of responsibility.
The American social compact has a third distinctive feature: our system of federalism, in which some subnational institutions enjoy independent rather than delegated authority.
More broadly conceived, the US social compact also includes public-sector activities that contribute to economic growth, opportunity, and stability Since the New Deal, the federal government has been held responsible for the economy, and it has responded with a blend of public investments and regulations.
The point may be generalized: It is to the best long-range interests of those nations based on social compacts of some sort to plan, establish, and maintain the type of education, which fosters such knowledge.
This passage defines the social compact, the fundamental element in Rousseau's vision of a well-ordered society.
In this respect then, a society defined by the presence of the social compact is understood as, in a sense, a whole greater than the sum of its parts.
This conflict occurs often in the derivative kind of social compact that characterizes a classroom.
The recently published Locked in a Cabinet by Robert Reich, former secretary of labor, raises serious questions about the disintegration of the social compact that has held us together as a nation.
Every society is defined by a social compact that sets out the obligations of its members to one another.
In an information economy of shifting technologies and virtual careers, it is that much harder to negotiate social compacts.
Regulation is also necessary to create oases from short-term economic pressure, so that durable social compacts can be negotiated.
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