social class


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Related to social class: social stratification, Social mobility

social class

a grouping of people with similar values, interests, income, education, and occupations.

social class

1. Social standing or position. Synonym: socioeconomic status
2. A group of people with shared culture, privilege, or position.
References in periodicals archive ?
Second, the activity is designed to disrupt some of their commonsensical thinking around the construction of social class categories, not to introduce them to the concept for the first time in their lives.
Relationship between CMV seroprevalence and donor sex, age and social class resulted in our study as reported before in the literature.
First, we need to understand how people see themselves and others, so we ask them, "What social class are you in?
Marrying someone from a lower social class adds years to a woman's biological age.
And moving down in the world by marrying someone from a lower social class adds years to a woman's biological age.
Social class isn't a particularly fashionable topic in contemporary art--especially in the US, where the matrix of habits and mores that remain key to the makeup and operation of English society is routinely disregarded in favor of base economic competition--but Baxter's work functions in part through a consistent play on just such cultural stratification.
Adolescent Lives in Transition: How Social Class Influences the Adjustment to Middle School.
This issue of CrossCurrents' focus on social class and religion is one that is overdue and difficult.
The well-being of the elderly, generally seen as those over the age of sixty, was determined not simply by such obvious factors as personal health, but by the intersection of custom, tradition, community values, social class, gender and changing social conditions.
American ideals purporting that citizens are entitled to a free and equal education have fallen woefully short of the intended goals, particularly as they relate to social class and educational outcomes.
Nobody who followed Richard Rothstein's columns in the New York Times or his earlier work on education will be surprised that his new book ascribes most of the black-white achievement gap to social class and economics.
In one chapter, the writers note: "African-American style, of course, appears in a multitude of guises determined by a range of different factors, such as social class, age, gender, sexuality and region.