snuff

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Related to snuffs: snuffing

snuff

(snŭf),
1. To inhale forcibly through the nose.
2. Finely powdered tobacco used by inhalation through the nose or applied to the gums.
3. Any medicated powder applied by insufflation to the nasal mucous membrane.
[echoic]

snuff

(snŭf)
n.
1.
a. A preparation of finely pulverized tobacco that can be drawn up into the nostrils by inhaling. Also called smokeless tobacco.
b. The quantity of this tobacco that is inhaled at a single time; a pinch.
2. See dip.
3. A powdery substance, such as a medicine, taken by inhaling.
intr.v. snuffed, snuffing, snuffs
To use or inhale snuff.

snuff

a powder that is inhaled through the nostrils.

chewing tobacco

A form of smokeless tobacco sold as a shredded product, in contrast to dipping tobacco in which the tobacco leaves are ground.

Health effects
Oral cancer; often disfiguring due to heroic surgery.

snuff

Substance abuse A smokeless tobacco consumed by snorting; snuff may be more dangerous than smoking 1 pack of cigarettes/day, and have 2-fold more carcinogens. See Smokeless tobacco, smoking.

snuff

(snŭf)
1. To inhale forcibly through the nose.
2. Finely powdered tobacco used by inhalation through the nose or application to the gums.
3. Any medicated powder applied by insufflation to the nasal mucous membrane.

snuff

(snŭf)
1. To inhale forcibly through the nose.
2. Finely powdered tobacco used by nasal inhalation or applied to the gums.
3. Any medicated powder applied by insufflation to the nasal mucous membrane.

snuff,

snuff dipper's lesion,
n a white or discolored lesion of the oral mucosa occurring at the site at which the powdered tobacco is retained. Malignant transformations are not common but do occur, usually as low-grade verrucous carcinomas.
References in classic literature ?
See, he takes snuff to bring tears to his eyes that are dry with wickedness.
Many persons envied the quiet existence of this old bachelor, spent on whist, boston, backgammon, reversi, and piquet, all well played, on dinners well digested, snuff gracefully inhaled, and tranquil walks about the town.
Suppose the servant really killed the master, or suppose the master isn't really dead, or suppose the master is dressed up as the servant, or suppose the servant is buried for the master; invent what Wilkie Collins' tragedy you like, and you still have not explained a candle without a candlestick, or why an elderly gentleman of good family should habitually spill snuff on the piano.
He had snuff because it was the eighteenth century luxury; wax candles, because they were the eighteenth century lighting; the mechanical bits of iron represent the locksmith hobby of Louis XVI; the diamonds are for the Diamond Necklace of Marie Antoinette.
Henderland's dwelling, than to my great surprise (for I was now used to the politeness of Highlanders) he burst rudely past me, dashed into the room, caught up a jar and a small horn-spoon, and began ladling snuff into his nose in most excessive quantities.
returned the old man, staying his pinch of snuff on its road, and pointing at the place without looking at it.
Sir,' returned the old man, squeezing his little packet of snuff in his hand, and turning upon his interrogator as if such questions hurt him.
What ever possessed you to take salt and snuff, young man?
The only question is, whether the gentleman, being on the ground, must not be considered, as a matter of form, to be the individual who insulted our friend, Doctor Slammer, yesterday evening, whether he is really that individual or not;' and having delivered this suggestion, with a very sage and mysterious air, the man with the camp-stool took a large pinch of snuff, and looked profoundly round, with the air of an authority in such matters.
This immovability of face, and the habit of taking a pinch of snuff before he gave an answer, made him trebly oracular to Mr.
Riley's gravity gave way, and he shook a little under the application of his pinch of snuff before he said,--
I say,' repeated Miss Brass, taking another pinch of snuff, 'that he's the thief.