snore

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snore

(snōr),
1. A rough, rattling, inspiratory noise produced by vibration of the pendulous palate, or sometimes of the vocal folds, during sleep or coma.
See also: stertor, rhonchus.
2. To breathe noisily, or with a snore.
[A.S. snora]

snore

(snor)
1. rough, noisy breathing during sleep, due to vibration of the uvula and soft palate.
2. to produce such sounds during sleep.

snore

(snôr)
intr.v. snored, snoring, snores
To breathe during sleep with harsh, snorting noises caused by vibration of the soft palate.
n.
1. The act or an instance of snoring.
2. The noise so produced.

snor′er n.

snore

[snôr]
a harsh, rough sound of breathing caused by vibration of the uvula and soft palate during sleep.

snore

Snoring Sleep disorders A harsh buzzing noise in a sleeper, produced primarily with inspiration during sleep due to vibration of soft palate and pillars of oropharyngeal inlet; snoring ↑ with age; it affects 60% of ♂, 40% of ♀; many snorers have incomplete obstruction of upper airway, and may develop obstructive sleep apnea; it is associated with ↑ risk of HTN, coronary ischemia, CVAs; alcoholism, arthritis, asthma, daytime drowsiness, depression, DM, insomnia, obesity World record A Swede who saws wood at 93 dB Management Isolated snoring needs no treatment; it may be ↓ with a nasal dilator, or surgery to tighten redundant soft palate. See Obstructive sleep anpea syndrome. Cf Sleep disorders, Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty.

snore

(snōr)
1. A rough, rattling inspiratory noise produced by vibration of the pendulous palate, or sometimes of the vocal cords, during sleep or coma.
See also: stertor, rhonchus
2. To breathe noisily, or with a snore.
[A.S. snora]

Patient discussion about snore

Q. In what way snoring is related to ADHD? My 5 year old son snores at night. He has disturbed sleep too and as a result the very next morning he remains sleepy for the day. This makes him tired and he is showing the signs of denial to go to school and make excuses. I have taken him to the doctor for the snoring problem. After some rounds of check up and some tests and with the help of a psychologist he was confirmed for ADHD. In what way snoring is related to ADHD?

A. Sleep apnea (while asleep the person stop breathing occasionally) in children has been linked to growth problems, ADHD, poor school performance, learning difficulties, bedwetting, and high blood pressure. it is a serious matter, if you did a sleep study - it probably shown up if he has it. not all children that snores have sleep apnea.

More discussions about snore
References in periodicals archive ?
BIRMINGHAM'S worst snorers are set to be given their marching orders by loved ones - and sent to a Snoring Boot Camp.
Many snorers suffer from excessive daytime sleepiness, which is bad enough in itself.
For a significant number of snorers, though, the disturbing nighttime racket is related to a physical obstruction of breathing during sleep.
Since 2012, Theravent REGULAR strength has surpassed over one million quiet nights of sleep for snorers and their bed partners.
The study reveals changes in the carotid artery with snorers - even for those without sleep apnea - likely due to the trauma and subsequent inflammation caused by the vibrations of snoring.
FAMOUS SNORER Hollywood actor Tom Cruise BAD HABITS Drinking and smoking are known to have a negative effect on the problem of snoring OPENING UP THE AIRWAY A patient using a CPAP machine (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure) NOISE Snoring can be a major problem between couples, with many choosing to sleep separately
For some snorers, lifestyle changes can be effective in overcoming the problem.
It ruins relationships and can cause exhaustion to snorers who may also be disturbed by their own snoring.
BAD SLEEPER: a woman snorer tries to grab some sleep
In my experience, how you feel about the snore is pretty much how you feel about the snorer.
Besides, what is wrong with a well placed elbow to make the snorer change position?
Another factor might be nasal disease, such as mucous growths or a crooked nasal membrane; then again, Curtis writes, it could be just simple congestion that manifests whenever the snorer sleeps on his or her back.