sniff

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sniff

(snĭf)
v. sniffed, sniffing, sniffs
v.intr.
1.
a. To inhale a short, audible breath through the nose, as in smelling something.
b. To sniffle.
2. To use the sense of smell, as in savoring or investigating: sniffed at the jar to see what it held.
3. To regard something in a contemptuous or dismissive manner: The critics sniffed at the adaptation of the novel to film.
4. Informal To pry; snoop: The reporters came sniffing around for more details.
v.tr.
1. To inhale forcibly through the nose: sniffed the cool morning air.
2. To smell, as in savoring or investigating: sniffed the lilacs; sniffed the breeze for traces of smoke.
3. To perceive or detect by or as if by sniffing: dogs that sniffed out the trail through the snow; sniffed trouble ahead.
4. To utter in a contemptuous or haughty manner: The countess sniffed her disapproval.
n.
1. An instance or the sound of sniffing.
2. Something sniffed or perceived by or as if by sniffing; a whiff: a sniff of perfume; a sniff of scandal.

sniff′a·ble adj.
sniff′er n.

sniff

(snif)
1. To inhale through the nostrils with the mouth closed.
2. To smell in short, quick inhalations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Source and destination IP addresses of the tunnel are changed repeatedly, making it difficult for attackers to sniff communication traffic.
This close link led Sobel and his scientific team to theorize that the ability to sniff - that is, to control soft palate movement - might be preserved even in the most acute cases of paralysis.
Accordingly, the only remaining question for the Court was whether the dog sniff itself was a separate search requiring additional justification to be valid under the Fourth Amendment.
That's because people use their noses to sniff imaginary as well as real aromas, and the mere act of sniffing scentless air kick-starts odor perception, a new study finds.
As Hammock built her olfactometer, Lytwyn puzzled over how to teach an otter to sniff on command.
If the motorist denied permission, a narcotics detection dog would be summoned to sniff the exterior of the vehicle.
As the use of dogs by law enforcement has increased, so too has the amount of case law addressing the Fourth Amendment implications of dog sniffs.
In such a short time, not much odor has developed, so it's a real challenge for the female black Labradors, Gracie and Cutter, to sniff out the drug.
4] However, courts still confront challenges to dog sniffs based on their reliability.
The basic difference between left- and right-nostril sniffs depends on airflow, explains Noam Sobel of Stanford University.
The dog sniffs the pipes until it finds the one whose scent matches the crime scene evidence.