sniff

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Related to sniff out: come in handy, take account of, so much for, worse for wear

sniff

(snĭf)
v. sniffed, sniffing, sniffs
v.intr.
1.
a. To inhale a short, audible breath through the nose, as in smelling something.
b. To sniffle.
2. To use the sense of smell, as in savoring or investigating: sniffed at the jar to see what it held.
3. To regard something in a contemptuous or dismissive manner: The critics sniffed at the adaptation of the novel to film.
4. Informal To pry; snoop: The reporters came sniffing around for more details.
v.tr.
1. To inhale forcibly through the nose: sniffed the cool morning air.
2. To smell, as in savoring or investigating: sniffed the lilacs; sniffed the breeze for traces of smoke.
3. To perceive or detect by or as if by sniffing: dogs that sniffed out the trail through the snow; sniffed trouble ahead.
4. To utter in a contemptuous or haughty manner: The countess sniffed her disapproval.
n.
1. An instance or the sound of sniffing.
2. Something sniffed or perceived by or as if by sniffing; a whiff: a sniff of perfume; a sniff of scandal.

sniff′a·ble adj.
sniff′er n.

sniff

(snif)
1. To inhale through the nostrils with the mouth closed.
2. To smell in short, quick inhalations.
References in periodicals archive ?
I'd trained dogs to sniff out all kinds of things, including lobsters and turtle eggs.
I think they serve even more value than the things they sniff out.
Moreover, the Dutch police certify every dog for scent identification lineups following a canine curriculum that includes 1 year of intensive training and a series of tests verifying the dog's ability to sniff out suspects.
The dogs can sniff out more than 12 accelerants,'' Kross said.
Flower was credited with helping sniff out the truth in a 1999 arson in which a woman was found dead off the Hollywood Freeway in North Hollywood.
Known for his ability to sniff out suspicious activity, DeArmas has received three commendations from the Sheriff's Department for busting burglary rings, armed robbers and drug dealers simply by following his intuition.
The military is paying $25 million - a chunk of that to Lewis - to develop an artificial dog nose sensitive enough to sniff out the faint chemical traces of land mines, which maim thousands each year.