snap

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snap

 [snap]
a short, sharp sound.
opening snap a short, sharp, high-pitched click occurring in early diastole and caused by opening of the mitral cusps, a characteristic sound in mitral stenosis.

snap

(snap),
A click; a short sharp sound; said especially of cardiac sounds.

snap

(snap) a short, sharp sound.
opening snap  a short, sharp sound in early diastole caused by abrupt halting at its maximal opening of an abnormal atrioventricular valve.

snap

Cardiology noun A click or other sharp sound corresponding to an abnormal mitral valve opening–opening snap, or closing–closing snap Psychiatry verb To suffer abrupt decompensation in social or interpersonal coping mechanisms. See Postal worker syndrome.

snap

(snap)
A click; a short, sharp sound; said especially of cardiac sounds.

SNAP

Abbrev. for SCORE FOR NEONATAL ACUTE PHYSIOLOGY.

snap

a short, sharp sound.

snap joint
capable of moving abruptly from a stable, in the sense of having great stability than the sense of its domicile, to a more mobile position, e.g. the equine elbow joint.
opening snap
a short, sharp, high-pitched click occurring in early diastole caused by opening of the mitral cusps, a characteristic sound in mitral stenosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
FANCYING a ginger snap back in his room after a busy day, Robin Cook rang room service for tea and biscuits.
He took a good check in the corner of his own zone in the first period, a check that caused his head to snap back in a twisting motion.
It's resuscitating their polymers that puts the snap back, Bourne says.
He explained to reporters last week that both sides will be able to snap back if either side violates the agreement.
Using a doll to demonstrate those actions to the jury, Velasquez said Perez claimed to have seen Rogelio hold the child up by the ankles and let her fall back until he suddenly broke her fall with a hand to her back, which forced her head to snap back.
For reasons yet to be determined, the protons in the lipoproteins of people with cancer were held more "loosely" -- they took a longer time to snap back into alignment than those of the other groups.
At the other end, they can make cords that stretch easily and snap back as readily as rubber bands.