smudging

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smudging

A term of art referring to the deposition of soot from partially burnt gases from a discharged firearm.

smudging

(smŭj′ĭng)
A speech defect in which difficult consonants are omitted.

smudging (smuˑ·jing),

n in Native American medicine, the ritual of purifying the location, patient, healer, helpers and ritual objects by using the smoke obtained by burning sacred plants, such as sage, sweetgrass, and cedar. It alters the state of consciousness and enhances sensitivity. This altered sensitivity to imbalances in the spiritual and energetic realms is necessary for the healer to assess and treat an illness. Cleansing often initiates healing sessions.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 27-year-old had owned Smudge for seven years before she was brutally killed.
He said: "The vet said when Smudge was sick, it was meat.
The inventor of the Smudge Cleaner has developed a working prototype that has been utilized with success.
It didn't smudge and it was as good as expensive brands I've bought in the past.
Smudge the cat was allowed to prowl Bodnant Gardens after her owners asked if only dog walkers could visit the beauty spot
Capable of fine lines STILA SMUDGE STICK WATERPROOF EYE LINER (pounds 13) Ideal for the party season, this is a golden shade with tiny flakes of golden dust.
Smudge chases Biscuit around, he plays hide and seek but she doesn't know that they are playing.
Gold Cup Master Smudge, 1980 Tied Cottage led all the way in the 1980 Gold Cup and beat Master Smudge on merit by eight lengths but, because of contaminated feed, he failed the drugs test and had to be disqualified.
However, the brush was difficult to manoeuvre on the lower lashes and it did smudge easily.
Washington, Aug 20 (ANI): The touch screens of smart phones, portable media players and other devices tend to smudge easily, but scientists say they have a test to determine the chemical composition and the effectiveness of protective coatings, a finding that may lead to the development of better anti-smudge, anti-reflective coverings.
In common language it is usually referred to as "gold smudge.