smoke-free workplace

smoke-free workplace

Labor law A workplace where use of cigarettes and other tobacco smoke products–cigars, pipes, is not allowed indoors
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2005, more than 12,000 Liverpool people sent postcards to the government supporting 100% smoke-free workplace legislation.
A survey on Teesside by Fresh revealed three in four people support a smoke-free workplace for all.
It found that 68% think a ban would be a fair way of achieving a smoke-free workplace, although half of these agree it would be difficult to implement.
The percentage of respondents who reported smoke-free workplace policies was calculated and reported by state and by respondents' education level.
As much noise as the tobacco companies make, smoke-free workplace laws are not about smokers' rights or prohibition.
Right now, over 30 countries across the world have smoke-free workplace laws, which is pretty amazing.
In fact, Oregon law now requires almost all employers to maintain a smoke-free workplace and to display `No Smoking' signs in their establishments.
The opportunity to work in a smoke-free workplace should not be a matter of choice - it should be a right.
The poll, carried out by Mori, found support for a smoke-free workplace was strong across all social classes: 86 per cent of social class AB; 83 per cent of social class C1; 79 per cent of social class C2; and 72 per cent of social class DE.
However,providing a smoke-free workplace needn't be difficult or controversial if employers follow simple guidelines to assist them in setting the right smoking policy for their organisation.
In 1994, the California State Legislature had the courage to pass the California Smoke-Free Workplace Act and Gov.
SmokeFree Liverpool project manager Andrea Crossfield said: 'We're an official part of the consultation process for the government legislation and we'd hope to convince them that all workers should have the right to a smoke-free workplace.