smear

(redirected from smears)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

smear

 [smēr]
a specimen for microscopic study, the material being spread thinly and unevenly across the slide with a swab or loop, or with the edge of another slide.
Smears from opaque thick liquids or semisolids, such as stool, can be made using a swab to sample and smear the material. From Mahon and Manuselis, 1995.
Pap smear (Papanicolaou smear) see papanicolaou test.

smear

(smēr),
A thin specimen for examination; it is usually prepared by spreading material uniformly onto a glass slide, fixing it, and staining it before examination.

smear

(smēr) a specimen for microscopic study prepared by spreading the material across the slide.
Pap smear , Papanicolaou smear see under test.

smear

(smîr)
n.
Biology A sample, as of blood or bacterial cells, spread on a slide for microscopic examination or on the surface of a culture medium.

smear

Etymology: AS, smeoru, grease
a laboratory specimen for microscopic examination prepared by spreading a thin film of tissue or fluid on a glass slide. A dye, stain, reagent, diluent, or lysing agent may be applied to the specimen, depending on the purpose of the examination.

smear

Tuberculosis A specimen gobbed on a glass slide, stained, washed in an acid solution, and examined by LM to detect AFB in a specimen. See Acid-fast bacilli, Wet mount.

smear

(smēr)
A thin specimen for microscopic examination; usually prepared by spreading liquid or semisolid material uniformly onto a glass slide, fixing it, and staining it before examination.

smear

(smer) [Old English. smerian, to anoint]
1. In bacteriology, material spread on a surface, as a microscopic slide or a culture medium.
2. Material obtained from infected matter spread over solid culture media.
3. Cellular material obtained from a body structure by swabbing, gently scraping, or scratching.
Enlarge picture
PREPARATION OF BLOOD SMEAR
Enlarge picture
PREPARATION OF BLOOD SMEAR

blood smear

A drop of (anticoagulated) whole blood spread thinly on a glass microscope slide so that blood cell types can be examined, counted, and characterized. Synonym: peripheral blood smear

Procedure: The slide must be grease-free. It is cleaned with alcohol, rinsed in warm water, and wiped clean with a lint-free towel or lens paper.A small drop of blood is placed on the slide; the end of another slide (spreader slide) is placed against the first slide at a 45° angle and pulled back against the drop of blood so that the drop spreads between the point of contact of the two slides. Then the spreader slide is pushed forward against the first slide; the blood will form an even, thin smear. The slide is dried by waving it in the air; it should not be heated. The blood smear is covered with Wright's stain and allowed to stand 2 min. An equal amount of distilled water or buffer solution is added and mixed uniformly. It is allowed to stand 5 min. The stain is gently washed off and the slide is allowed to dry.

See: illustrationillustration

buccal smear

A sample of cells taken from the mucosa lining the cheek for chromosomal or other studies.

Pap smear

Papanicolaou test.

peripheral blood smear

Synonym: blood smear

smear

A thin film of tissue, cells, blood or other material spread on a transparent slide for microscopic examination.

Smear

A specimen prepared for microscopic study by spreading the material across a slide and treating it with a specific stain.
Mentioned in: Leprosy

smear

(smēr)
Thin specimen for examination; usually prepared by spreading material uniformly onto a glass slide, fixing it, and staining it before examination.

smear

a specimen for microscopic study, the material being spread thinly and unevenly across the slide with a swab or loop, or with the edge of another slide, e.g. blood smear, for differential white cell count, or trypanosome sighting, fecal for the presence of worm eggs or coccidial oocysts.

impression smear
one made by pressing the slide against tissue, usually the surface of a neoplasm or the cut surface of a tissue specimen.
References in periodicals archive ?
You absolutely do still need smears and you are still at risk of developing cancer.
Four of the 5 extra air-dried direct smears were immediately triaged to the immunoperoxidase laboratory where they were fixed for 30 minutes in formalin at room temperature, rinsed in water, and then processed for immunostaining.
In addition, under optimal conditions, HPV testing is more effective than Pap smears in detecting precancerous and cancerous lesions.
WOMEN will this week be urged to have a regular smear test as part of an annual European campaign to increase uptake of the life-saving screening programme.
The team's initial response to the cervical cancer mortality rate was that lack of access to affordable Pap smears was the problem.
TWO years too young for a smear test which could have saved her, Claire Walker Everett's life was tragically cut short.
And if the NHS does genuinely want to increase the uptake of women having smears, they should at least increase the people employed to read the results in order to cope with the demand.
Summary: The Government has announced it will not be lowering the age for smear tests after a review into cervical cancer.
Their direct smears (ZN smears) were stained by hot ZN method.
In the United States, 85 percent of smears are now done using a liquid that spreads the cells into a single layer.
The more smears a woman has had, the lower the rate of HPV infection, and that protects her against developing cervical cancer.