Sly

(redirected from slyness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms.
Related to slyness: in turn, jiggery

Sly

(slī),
William S., 20th-century U.S. physician. See: Sly syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's been conveniently overlooked that the goal scored by WilliamGallas from Henry's slyness only denied Ireland the chance of a probable penalty shoot-out.
The show could have used more slyness, which is only hinted at - such as in Mary and Bert's relationship.
26), or her comments about the system such as "existing socialism socialized people into passivity, servility, and slyness in relation to estranged conditions, and that we suffer the consequences to this day" (p.
However, it is the slyness of names, the shrewdness of metaphors that allows Sharon to be the heir of Samson; Binyamin Ben-Eliezer to be the heir of Elazar ben Yair; and the "never failed to fail" president of Israel Shimon Peres to be the heir of Simon Bar Kokhba "the Simon of lies" not "the son of the star.
Yet, with a slyness worthy of Weill, Gordon wields his hummable tunes to critical effect.
In The Philosopher's Stone, Norbert provides opportunities for individual characters to reveal certain traits and qualities such as Hagrid's tenderness and Malfoy's slyness, and the Hungarian Horntail in The Goblet of Fire enables Harry to express his noble sense of fair play and Ron his resentment and remorse.
Its opposite is slyness, cleverness, and the duplicity of a perverse heart.
On June 12, Roosevelt received another dispatch from Lamsdorf that displayed "a certain slyness and an endeavor to avoid anything like a definite committal, which .
The peculiarity is also a certain kind of slyness, as myth is a form that remains hidden in multiple layers of prior meanings.
Rather than merely providing another perfectly scholarly but exceedingly dull translation of what is supposed to be a knee-slapper, Relihan (classics, Wheaton College) digs deep into the spirit of the piece, re-creating Apuleius's slyness, plays upon words and images, and irreverence that cloaks deep faith.
These attributes were usually cunningness, slyness and craftiness.
The court interpreter, a brilliant cameo, encapsulates all the slyness of the survivor who gets by on providing the story he believes the Court ought to hear.