slush


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slush

 [slush]
an ice solution with a consistency like that of snow, used for preservation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The investment offered to the Slush 100 winner was once again the largest investment ever offered as grand prize in a similar pitching contest.
A quick calculation shows that even the relatively smaller volumes of slush money, of ` 34,000 crore to ` 64,000 crore, if funnelled into the public kitty, will deliver huge benefits.
The case centred on the convictions of two former Siemens executives sentenced last year for using slush funds to win telecommunications contracts from Italy's Enel between 1999 and 2002.
Parliament voted to set up the independent probe into claims by the group s former chief lawyer that it created a slush fund totalling 200 billion won (197 million dollars) to bribe government officials and politicians.
The officials said the Defense Ministry and the Self-Defense Forces built up slush funds over several decades using the reward outlay budget for intelligence gathering by issuing fake receipts.
The Slush program boosted the chain's non-alcohol beverage mix, which was not growing at the same rate as food sales.
Smackers Fresh Juicee Lip Gloss in Raspberry Slush, $3, drugstores
According to the Associated Press, Chairman Chung Mong-koo, 68, was accused of embezzling about $106 million in company money to create a slush fund that it used to pay lobbyists for obtaining government favors.
While London officials have made good on their promise to use toll revenue only for transport purposes, American politicians have a habit of steering toll money into nebulous slush funds and turning transport bills into free-for-alls.
The Globe points out that the super-lobbyist's Russian clients slopped huge sums of money into the "US Family Network," a nonprofit established by Abramoff supposedly to raise money for Evangelical Christian charities--but that actually was used as a slush fund for Abramoff and his cronies.
The larvae can't do much more than drool, but powerful chemicals in the liquid turn fruit-fly meat into a baby-food-like pile of moist protein slush.