slow pathway

slow pathway

Cardiology An anomalous conduction pathway in the heart which has no known functions; the SP provides the antegrade limb of a reentry circuit in atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia–AVNRT–the fast pathway provides the retrograde limb–the 'slow-fast' or common form of AVNRT; selective catheter ablation of the atrial end of the SP eliminates AVNRT with little risk of AV block
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Which parameters describe the electrophysiological properties of successful slow pathway RF ablation in patients with common atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia?
The aim of our study was describe the electrophysiological properties of successful slow pathway RF ablation in patients with common atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia.
Methods: The study design was a retrospective analysis involving fifty consecutive patients (18 males; mean age of 39+22 years) who underwent slow pathway ablation because of AVNRT.
Conclusion: In patients with AVNRT undergoing slow pathway ablation, the duration of atrial electrogram >40 ms and slow junctional beats with cycle length >550 ms during the application of RF energy describe the electrophysiological properties of successful slow pathway RF ablation.
Conduction over the slow pathway, connecting to the atrium in the posterior (inferior) septum, can be revealed when an atrial impulse is blocked in the fast pathway (which generally has a longer antegrade effective refractory period than the slow pathway) leading to a sudden prolongation of the AH interval.
The aim of our study is to describe the electrophysiological properties of successful slow pathway RF ablation in patients with common atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia.
Fifty consecutive patients (18 males; mean age of 39 [+ or -] 22 years) who underwent successful slow pathway ablation for AVNRT were enrolled in the present retrospective study, after having given written informed consent.
In this series of patients undergoing slow pathway ablation to eliminate AVNRT, a combined anatomic and electrogram mapping approach was used and a successful outcome was achieved in all patients.
demonstrated that successful ablation of slow pathway seldom occurs in the absence of JR.
The patient subsequently underwent ablation of the slow pathway and was discharged on thyroxine.
We were able to confirm the correct ablation site after one cryomap, and then proceeded to successfully eliminate the slow pathway with one cryomap-cryoablation cycle.
Cryothermal ablation of the slow pathway for the elimination of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia.