slipping rib


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rib

 [rib]
any of the paired bones, 12 on either side, extending from the thoracic vertebrae toward the median line on the ventral aspect of the trunk, forming the major part of the thoracic skeleton. Called also costa. See anatomic Table of Bones in the Appendices.
abdominal r's (asternal r's) false ribs.
cervical rib a supernumerary rib arising from a cervical vertebra.
false r's the five lower ribs on either side, not attached directly to the sternum.
floating r's the two lower false ribs on either side, usually without ventral attachment.
slipping rib one whose attaching cartilage is repeatedly dislocated.
true r's the seven upper ribs on either side, attached to both vertebrae and sternum.
vertebral r's floating ribs.
vertebrocostal r's the three upper false ribs on either side, attached to vertebrae and costal cartilages.
vertebrosternal r's true ribs.

slip·ping rib

subluxation of a rib cartilage, with costochondral separation.

slipping rib

a condition in which a loose ligament allows one of the lower five ribs to slip inside or outside an adjacent rib, causing pain or discomfort. The symptoms may mimic those of a disorder of the pancreas, gallbladder, or other upper abdominal organ.

rib

any one of the paired, curved, cylindrical bones, extending from the thoracic vertebrae to the ventral aspect of the trunk, forming the major part of the thoracic skeleton, and consisting of a dorsal bony part and a ventral cartilaginous part that may or may not articulate with the sternum. Typically 13 pairs in the dog, cat and ruminants, 18 pairs in horses and 14 or 15 pairs in the pig. Called also costa. See Table 10.

abdominal r's, asternal r's
a rib whose ventral end does not meet the sternum. See also false ribs (below).
cervical rib
a supernumerary rib arising from a cervical vertebra.
rib contractor
a strongly built device for pulling ribs together following retraction for surgical access to the thoracic cavity.
false r's
the caudal ribs, not attached directly to the sternum but are attached to each other's sternal cartilage to form the costal arch.
floating rib
a rib whose distal extremity is unattached to an adjacent rib or the sternum.
rib retractor
heavy duty surgical instrument for separating ribs to allow surgeon better access to thoracic contents. See finochietto rib spreader.
slipping rib
one whose attaching cartilage is repeatedly dislocated.
sternal rib
true ribs articulating with the sternum.
true r's
the ribs attached to both vertebrae and sternum.
vertebral r's
floating ribs.
vertebrocostal r's
the false ribs that contribute to the costal arch.
vertebrosternal r's
true ribs.

Patient discussion about slipping rib

Q. how long dose costochondritis last

A. a friend of mine who had the disease saw an improvement within a few weeks, and it resolved completely within a few months,but his doctor said there are patients in whom this problem persists for some time. All symptoms of pain should resolve within six months.

Q. I was in the ER because of a chest pain and the doctor there said its costochondritis. What does it mean? I am a 42 years old man. Last night i went to the ER because of a chest pain. The doctors there did many test and in the end they said its costochondritis. What does it mean? Can someone elaborate about the risk factors that can cause this symptom?

A. It seems that you are suffering from a traumatic injury to the skeleton that is near the heart which is called costochondritis. It can be a result of a simple trauma to the area or (as in my case, I am a rower) due to repetitive use of the muscles of the thorax and arms

Q. What is the differential diagnosis of chest pain in a 35 year old woman? I am a 35 years old woman. I suffer from chest pain for about 24 hours. I just came back from a trip to Europe, and i feel really bad. I smoke and I take anti contraceptive and i know that I am at a risk for pulmonary embolism or costochondritis. Cat it be something else?

A. The differential diagnosis of chest pain is very wide.
It can start in costochondritis if u carried a lot of luggage or might be pulmonary embolism if you didn't move from the chair all the flight. But it can also be a sign for an acute coronary syndrome (even at the age of 35) or a pericarditis. To be sure you need to consult with your GP.

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