slip

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Related to slip of the tongue: Freudian slip

slip

(slip)
1. To move out of a customary place; to dislocate (e.g., an intervertebral disk).
2. To slide into or on top of.
References in periodicals archive ?
I relate to it as a regrettable slip of the tongue," said Lieberman, head of the Yisrael Beitenu party, Israel's third largest faction, said.
Prime Minister Gordon Brown made himself the butt of mockery in the House of Commons when a slip of the tongue led him to boast "we have saved the world".
What Alun Cairns said about Italians was not a slip of the tongue.
But in an apparent slip of the tongue at his Downing Street Press conference, the Prime Minister appeared to suggest he had some foreknowledge of the committee's next decision tomorrow.
As she approaches her 13th birthday, her parents and brother are busily working on her birthday present when a slip of the tongue results in her parents being turned into pigs--nice pigs.
A slip of the tongue, to be sure -- but a revealing one.
DOUBLE STANDARD: Ron Atkinson is paying for his slip of the tongue but Trevor McDonald, below left, was allowed to criticise Bernard Manning, below
However, this slip of the tongue is reminiscent of another slip of the tongue by President George Bush when he spoke of a Crusade war against the Muslims in the aftermath of 9/11.
Given the temper of the times and the perspective of the Prime Minister, this is neither a slip of the tongue nor a careless remark.
Given the fashion in which America's foreign policy establishment repeatedly uses the same game plan--with only the names of the players and locations changing--it was an easy slip of the tongue to make, even for someone as plugged-in to the Establishment as Mr.
who held on to his seat as majority leader, is notable for having called openly gay representative Barney Frank "Barney Fag" and then insisting it was a slip of the tongue.
Microsoft Corp's cross-examination team cut short its questioning of Felten not long after it became clear the Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson had become annoyed with Heiner's line of questioning which appeared to be directed at getting Felten to make a slip of the tongue.