sling

(redirected from slings and arrows)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

sling

 [sling]
a bandage or suspensory for supporting a part.
Applying an arm sling. From Lammon et al., 1995.

sling

(sling),
A supporting bandage or suspensory device; especially a loop suspended from the neck and supporting the flexed forearm.

sling

(sling) a bandage or suspensory for supporting a part.
mandibular sling  a structure suspending the mandible, formed by the medial pterygoid and masseter muscles and aiding in mandibulomaxillary articulation.
pubovaginal sling  a support constructed of rectoabdominal fascia to stabilize the bladder from underneath in treatment of stress incontinence.
suburethral sling  a support constructed surgically from muscle, ligament, or synthetic material that elevates the bladder from underneath in the treatment of stress incontinence.

sling

(slĭng)
n.
A supporting bandage or suspensory device, especially a loop suspended from the neck and supporting the flexed forearm.

sling

Etymology: ME, slingen, to hurl
a bandage or device used to support an injured part of the body, especially a forearm. See also sling restraint.

sling

(sling)
A supporting bandage or suspensory device; especially a loop suspended from the neck and supporting the flexed forearm.

sling

A support, usually of folded cloth, to immobilize and rest the arm. Slings are used either as a first-aid measure or to place the arm in an appropriate position for the healing of a fractured collar bone (CLAVICLE). A sling may also be used to rest an arm which has sustained soft tissue injury or which is severely infected.

sling

suspensory for supporting a part.

body sling
canvas and metal sling for support of the abdomen with breastplate and breeching to prevent the horse slipping out forwards or backwards, and lifted from the ground by a block and tackle carried on an overhead beam or similar support. Used in horses; not a practicable proposition in cattle.
leg sling
for the support of a limb in a cattle beast. For a front leg the rope is looped around the pastern, thrown over an overhead beam, back under the sternum behind the elbow on the same side, then back over the beam. For a hindleg the rope begins as a loop around the pastern, goes over an overhead support, back inside the thigh on the same side, half-hitched around the tibia and held by a helper. In both the leg is lifted off the ground to the required position and the rope tightened to create the sling.
90/90 sling
wrapping is applied to maintain the tarsus and stifle in 90-degree flexion; used to prevent contracture of the quadriceps after fracture repair.
pelvic limb sling
the metatarsus is suspended by tape from a band of gauze and tape around the animal's abdomen. Used in small animals to prevent weight bearing on the limb, but not primarily for stabilization. Called also Robinson sling.
preputial sling
a many-tailed bandage around the body with an aperture for the preputial orifice.
sling procedure
a strip of fascia lata or synthetic material passed around the base of the tail or implanted in perianal tissue have been used in the treatment of fecal incontinence.
tail sling
a half-hitch is applied to the tail hairs, ensuring that the tissue part is omitted. The rope can be used to support the hindquarters of a horse but not a cattle beast. The technique can be used in cattle as an aid, e.g. to keep the tail out of the way while correcting a dystocia; the rope is tied around the cow's neck.
udder sling
a canvas bag with four strategically placed holes for the teats and supported by a harness over the hindquarters anchored to a neck collar to prevent it falling off the back. Not a particularly helpful device because of variation in the size of the vessel to be accommodated.
Velpeau sling
a gauze wrapping around the thorax and forelimb with the elbow fully flexed and the carpus touching the opposite shoulder. Used in dogs to prevent weight-bearing following surgery, luxation of the shoulder or fracture of the scapula.
Enlarge picture
Velpeau sling. By permission from Slatter D, Textbook of Small Animal Surgery, Saunders, 2002
References in periodicals archive ?
His turbulent lifestyle has survived the slings and arrows of outrageous behaviour, and he is still smiling.
So before all the slings and arrows are thrown, all I can say is farewell to the best of fellers who ever graced the Cavern's cellars.
The El Portal Center for the Arts, which has endured many slings and arrows in its debut season, should be lauded for its brave vision in bringing this cutting-edge stage work to Los Angeles.
In the end, though, it is how we cope with what are, in Shakespeare's words, ``the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,'' that is the measure of a man or a woman.
Talking about Talk: Sounds as if Miramax movie honcho Harvey Weinstein is feeling guilty about the slings and arrows his Talk magazine unleashed upon his beloved Hillary Clinton.
Appearing all dolled up at a teen-age party where he does a spaced-out solo dance, Eric endures the first slings and arrows of peer-group homophobia and flees in tears.
Councilwoman Jackie Goldberg, a constant critic of Mayor Richard Riordan's plan for charter reform, the city business tax proposal and almost anything else he does for the city, made the unfortunate and outrageous decision to direct her political slings and arrows at those outside City Hall.
With a strong district attorney like Michael Bradbury, public defenders must sometimes feel like the legal system's poor cousins, stung by the slings and arrows of the public and their counterparts alike.
The Lakers need O'Neal to develop a skin of steel, the better to deflect life's slings and arrows so they don't poison his progress or perspective.
For us to sit back and endure your slings and arrows, and all the while we have to keep smiling and dress nice.
Now it seems those slings and arrows have outraged the fair Gwyneth, who fired off a statement in Brad's defense to New York's Newsday.
Plenty of slings and arrows are aimed at organized religion by the atheists in the story, including Day's common-law husband, Forster (Lenny Von Dohlen), who complains that religion ``sucks all the joy right out of life.