sleep latency


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Related to sleep latency: MSLT

sleep latency

The length of time it takes from lying down for the night until sleep onset.

sleep latency

Sleep disorders The time period from lights out/bedtime to sleep onset

sleep latency

The amount of time between reclining in bed and the onset of sleep.
See also: latency

Sleep latency

The amount of time that it takes to fall asleep. Sleep latency is measured in minutes and is important in diagnosing depression.
Mentioned in: Sleep Disorders
References in periodicals archive ?
Cyclists managed less than one hour of continuous sleep per sleep episode, high sleep latency and high percentage moving time.
Practice parameters for clinical use of the multiple sleep latency test and the maintenance of wakefulness test.
In Howard's study (25), sleepiness was evaluated in resident physicians by multiple sleep latency tests, and sleep latency was found to be near or below levels associated with sleep disorders at basal and post call conditions in their study group.
Eszopiclone has demonstrated a significant reduction in sleep latency and improved measures of sleep maintenance, such as wake time after sleep onset and number of awakenings as compared with placebo.
This difference appeared to be due to improvement in the median sleep latency for the placebo group from week 1 to week 2 rather than a diminished effect for the eszopiclone 2 mg group.
Figure 1 presents sleep latency of Ken during conditions of baseline, treatment and follow-up.
In other studies that also were conducted during the descending BAC phase, alcohol reduced sleep latency, as measured by a standard MSLT, and impaired both attention and reaction-time performance in a do se-dependent manner.
The Multiple Sleep Latency Test is done during normal working hours.
Objective daytime sleepiness was measured using the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT), and pain sensitivity was assessed using a radiant heat stimulus.
Sleep latency was decreased and duration of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep was increased in a dose dependent manner.
In one study, 22% of patients with obstructive sleep apnea using effective CPAP--that is, CPAP for more than 6 hours per night--still had impaired daytime functioning because of excessive daytime sleepiness documented on objective tests, including the Multiple Sleep Latency Test.