slander

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slander

Etymology: Fr, esclandre, scandal
any words spoken with malice that are untrue and prejudicial to the reputation, professional practice, commercial trade, office, or business of another person. Formerly, slander included published defamation, but at present it is limited to spoken accusation. To bring legal action in slander, the slandered person must be able to demonstrate real temporal damages-except for cases in which the defamation relates to the person's business or profession or in which the malicious words question the person's chastity or accuse him or her of being a felon or of having a loathsome disease. Compare libel.

slander

(slăn′dĕr) [LL. scandalum, cause of offense]
Defaming the character of another through injurious speech. To qualify legally for slander, speech must intentionally impugn the reputation of another and be both malicious and demonstrably false.

slander,

n an oral defamation; the saying of false and malicious words about another, resulting in injury to his or her reputation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although it may be perfectly socially acceptable for the husband to accuse his wife of infidelity outright under these circumstances--after all, she and the other man were seen secluded together--the slander laws are very clear that he only has the right to express doubt.
From the episode of the spies, who maligned the goodness of the Land of Israel, we learn that slander applies not only to individuals but also to a nation, its land, its produce, etc.
This episode seems like a climax of the intermittent complaints about the lack of food and water, which can be called a slander against God Himself.
Thus, though engendered in innocence, gossip is a form of slander.
Slander is a spoken defamatory statement heard by a third person - as opposed to libel, which refers to written words.
POSH Spice, Victoria Beckham, was landed with a pounds 100,000 costs bill yesterday after losing a key part of a massive slander action involving a celebrity autograph shop.
Timothy, Glynis and Anthony McManus say the publicity damaged their business and are suing her for up to pounds 500,000 for slander and malicious falsehood.
Waddams' view is that slander suits were hard to defend, but judges obviously sought to discourage them.
Waddams persuasively argues that the law on sexual slander gave them some power.
Throughout the 1380s, the ability to secure the charge of slander and thereby resolve its inherent contradictions was typically contingent on power alone.
Historians and literary scholars have largely focused on the social impact of slander in late fourteenth-century England.
Not surprisingly, Gaunt was the regular target of popular slander and abuse.