slander

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Related to slanderers: swindlers

slander

Etymology: Fr, esclandre, scandal
any words spoken with malice that are untrue and prejudicial to the reputation, professional practice, commercial trade, office, or business of another person. Formerly, slander included published defamation, but at present it is limited to spoken accusation. To bring legal action in slander, the slandered person must be able to demonstrate real temporal damages-except for cases in which the defamation relates to the person's business or profession or in which the malicious words question the person's chastity or accuse him or her of being a felon or of having a loathsome disease. Compare libel.

slander

(slăn′dĕr) [LL. scandalum, cause of offense]
Defaming the character of another through injurious speech. To qualify legally for slander, speech must intentionally impugn the reputation of another and be both malicious and demonstrably false.

slander,

n an oral defamation; the saying of false and malicious words about another, resulting in injury to his or her reputation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Teazles' reconciliation, the union of Maria and Charles, along with the humiliation of the slanderers, Joseph Surface, Lady Sneerwell, and Snake, all point to a privileging of the private and familial over the public and social, much as in sentimental fiction where the public sphere is too cruel for the sensitive soul.
Why would he expect any dramatist, an Ibsen, a Chekhov, an O'Casey, to approve of the dark views of the slanderers or villains in his play?
Finally, Robinson's revisionist Memoirs, which purchasers supposed would be a titillating revelation of her affair with the Prince of Wales, but which was instead an effort to bleach all stain from the fabric of her life, supported her contentions in the Letter to the Women of England by sharing her own account of her relations with libertines, slanderers, and deserting fathers, husbands and lovers.
It couldn't be that the editors are promoting the notion that the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth are slanderers, could it?
He is ready to do good offices to the murderers of his fame, to his slanderers, backbiters, and detractors.
David Corn, Washington bureau chief of the Nation, told the Washington Post that in acting as he did, Robert Novak had become "the vehicle" for a "quite ugly and brutal act" by slanderers working secretly on behalf of the Bush administration.
As Bill Clinton joked at the Democratic Convention, what are these slanderers saying?
This poem describes a wise house, perhaps the world itself, devoid of slanderers, blockheads, loners, where infamy, power and flattery don't lure.
The Bible says: ``Do not be deceived: neither the sexually immoral,nor idolaters,nor adulterers,nor male prostitutes,nor homosexual offenders,nor thieves,nor the greedy,nor drunkards, nor slanderers,nor swindlers will inherit the kingdom of God.
He has been recognized as a patriot and supporter of Russian imperialism by pointing to "The Slanderers of Russia" (1831) and an "inner emigre" by suggesting that the poet tried to leave Russia many times.
Gaunt turned to the bishops for redress for it lay in their powers not only to excommunicate the slanderers but also to restore Gaunt's maligned reputation to good fame; defamation, moreover, was understood to be a spiritual offence and 'the more serious cases were tried in the Bishop's Consistory Court'.
Of course, it is easy to lose one's head in the heat of political strife, but what are we to think of those who, with every opportunity for reflection and the moderation of passion, accuse their political opponents of lying in cold print--which affords slanderers and calumniators a certain amount of protection?