slander

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slander

Etymology: Fr, esclandre, scandal
any words spoken with malice that are untrue and prejudicial to the reputation, professional practice, commercial trade, office, or business of another person. Formerly, slander included published defamation, but at present it is limited to spoken accusation. To bring legal action in slander, the slandered person must be able to demonstrate real temporal damages-except for cases in which the defamation relates to the person's business or profession or in which the malicious words question the person's chastity or accuse him or her of being a felon or of having a loathsome disease. Compare libel.

slander

(slăn′dĕr) [LL. scandalum, cause of offense]
Defaming the character of another through injurious speech. To qualify legally for slander, speech must intentionally impugn the reputation of another and be both malicious and demonstrably false.

slander,

n an oral defamation; the saying of false and malicious words about another, resulting in injury to his or her reputation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most treatises on slander do not target women in particular, and it can even be said that slanderers are generally assumed to be men.
Pushkin wrote "To the Slanderers of Russia" in 1831 as a reaction to French attempts to support the Polish insurgents, which reminded him of the French invasion of 1812.
Unlike those slanderers, Brener maintains a cool detachment throughout his examinations of the evidence.
It is, moreover, a poorly, or at least a very loosely, constructed play, with two separate plots clumsily grafted together--that of the Teazles or Slanderers and that of the Surface brothers.
In the film's last scene, however, the entire cast of characters is gathered in church, the living and the dead, the murderer with the murdered, the abused with the abusers, the slanderers with the slandered, all of them together receiving from one another the bread and cup of the Lord's Supper--and singing.
They will be unkind, merciless slanderers, violent and fierce.
Do they not include those who have money enough to employ the firebrands and slanderers in a community and the stirrers-up of social hate?
Why would he expect any dramatist, an Ibsen, a Chekhov, an O'Casey, to approve of the dark views of the slanderers or villains in his play?
Finally, Robinson's revisionist Memoirs, which purchasers supposed would be a titillating revelation of her affair with the Prince of Wales, but which was instead an effort to bleach all stain from the fabric of her life, supported her contentions in the Letter to the Women of England by sharing her own account of her relations with libertines, slanderers, and deserting fathers, husbands and lovers.
In the case of the play, the 'gossips' who gather to abuse their husbands are justified and the male chatterers who abuse women are exposed as slanderers.
Thus plate 2 is captioned 'The empress rejecting her brother-in-law', but both the rubric above the miniature and the evidence of plates 5, 9, 26, and 27 suggest that the heroine is here healing one of her former slanderers, now become leprous.
It couldn't be that the editors are promoting the notion that the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth are slanderers, could it?