skin graft


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Related to skin graft: Skin flap

graft

 [graft]
1. any tissue or organ for implantation or transplantation.
2. to implant or transplant such tissues. This term is preferred over transplant in the case of skin grafts. See also implant.
allogeneic graft allograft.
autodermic graft (autoepidermic graft) a skin graft taken from the patient's own body.
autologous graft (autoplastic graft) a graft taken from another area of the patient's own body; called also autograft.
avascular graft a graft of tissue in which not even transient vascularization is achieved.
bone graft bone transplanted from one site to another.
bypass graft an autograft consisting of a segment of vein or artery grafted into place in a bypass.
cable graft a nerve graft made up of several sections of nerve in the manner of a cable.
coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) see under bypass.
cutis graft dermal graft.
delayed graft a skin graft that is sutured back into its bed and subsequently used after several days.
dermal graft (dermic graft) a skin graft of dermis, used instead of fascia in various plastic procedures.
epidermic graft a skin graft in which a piece of epidermis is implanted on a raw surface.
fascia graft a graft of fibrous tissue, usually taken from the external investing fascia of the lower limb (fascia lata).
fascicular graft a nerve graft in which bundles of nerve fibers are approximated and sutured separately.
filler graft one used for the filling of defects, as the filling of depressions with fatty tissue or of a bony cyst cavity with bone chips or dried cartilage.
free graft a graft of tissue completely freed from its bed, in contrast to a flap.
full-thickness graft a skin graft consisting of the full thickness of the skin, with little or none of the subcutaneous tissue.
heterodermic graft a skin graft taken from a donor of another species.
heterologous graft (heteroplastic graft) xenograft.
homologous graft a graft of tissue obtained from the body of another animal of the same species but with a genotype differing from that of the recipient; called also allograft and homograft.
inlay graft a skin graft or mucosal graft applied by spreading the graft over a stent and suturing the graft and mold into a prepared pocket.
isogeneic graft (isologous graft) (isoplastic graft) syngraft.
lamellar graft replacement of the superficial layers of an opaque cornea by a thin layer of clear cornea from a donor eye.
mesh graft a type of split-thickness graft in which many tiny splits have been made in the skin to allow it to be stretched to cover a larger area.
Mesh skin graft applied to the leg. From McQuillan et al., 2002.
Ollier-Thiersch graft a very thin skin graft in which long, broad strips of skin, consisting of the epidermis, rete, and part of the corium, are used.
omental graft a segment of omentum and its supplying vasculature, transplanted as a free flap to another area and revascularized by anastomosis of arteries and veins.
pedicle graft pedicle flap.
penetrating graft a full-thickness corneal transplant.
periosteal graft a piece of periosteum to cover a denuded bone.
Phemister graft a bone graft of cortical bone with cancellous bone chips to enhance callus formation.
pinch graft a small piece of skin graft, partial or full thickness, obtained by elevating the skin with a needle and slicing it off with a knife.
porcine graft a split-thickness graft of skin from a pig, applied to a denuded area on a human as a temporary dressing for treatment of a severe burn.
sieve graft a skin graft from which tiny circular islands of skin are removed so that a larger denuded area can be covered, the sievelike portion being placed over one area, and the individual islands over surrounding or other denuded areas.
skin graft a piece of skin transplanted to replace a lost portion of skin; see also skin grafting.
split-skin graft (split-thickness graft) a skin graft consisting of the epidermis and a portion of dermis.
Diagram of a cross-section of the skin, demonstrating split thickness and full thickness skin grafts. From Roberts and Hedges, 1991.
syngeneic graft syngraft.
thick-split graft a skin graft consisting of the epidermis and about two thirds of the dermis.
Thiersch graft Ollier-Thiersch graft.

skin graft

a piece of skin transplanted from one part of the body to another.

skin graft

n.
A surgical graft of healthy skin from one part of the body to another or from one individual to another in order to replace damaged or lost skin.

skin grafting n.

skin graft

a part of skin implanted to cover areas where skin has been lost through burns or injury or by surgical removal of diseased tissue. To prevent tissue rejection of permanent grafts, the graft is taken from the patient's own body or from the body of an identical twin. Skin from another person or animal can be used as a temporary cover for large burned areas to decrease fluid loss. The area from which the graft is taken is called the donor site; that on which it is placed is called the recipient site. Various techniques are used, including pinch, split-thickness, full-thickness, pedicle, and mesh grafts. In pinch grafting, pieces of skin ¼ inch in diameter are placed as small islands on the recipient site that they will grow to cover. These grafts will grow even in areas of poor blood supply and are resistant to infection. The split-thickness graft consists of sheets of superficial and some deep layers of skin. Grafts of up to 4 inches wide and 10 to 12 inches long are removed from a flat surface-abdomen, thigh, or back-with an instrument called a dermatome. The grafts are sutured into place; compression dressings may be applied for firm contact, or the area may be left exposed to the air. A split-thickness graft cannot be used for weight-bearing parts of the body or for covering those subject to friction, such as the hand or foot. A full-thickness graft contains all skin layers and is more durable and effective for weight-bearing and friction-prone areas. A pedicle graft is one in which a part remains attached to the donor site, whereas the remainder is transferred to the recipient site. Its own blood supply remains intact, and it is not detached until the new blood supply has fully developed. This type is often used on the face, neck, or hand. A successful new graft of any type is well established in about 72 hours and can be expected to survive unless a severe infection or trauma occurs. Before surgery both the donor and the recipient site must be free of infection and the recipient site must have a good blood supply. After surgery, stretching or movement of the recipient site is prevented. Strict sterile technique is used for handling dressings, and antibiotics may be given prophylactically to prevent infection. Good nutrition with a high-protein, high-calorie diet is essential. See also autograft, graft, xenograft.

skin graft

Autologous, donated or surrogate skin removed from site A to cover site B that has been denuded by 3rd-degree burns or traumatic tissue loss.

skin graft

Autologous, donated, or surrogate skin removed from one site to cover surfaces on another region with 3rd-degree burns or traumatic tissue loss. See Split-thickness graft. Cf Artificial skin, 'Spray-on' skin.

skin graft

(skin graft)
Piece of skin transplanted from one part of the body to another.

skin graft

The transference of an area of skin from one part of the body to another. A plastic surgical technique used to repair areas of deficient skin. Skin grafts may be split-skin or full-thickness or may have attached blood vessels that are rejoined by microsurgery to vessels at the new location.

graft

1. any tissue or organ for implantation or transplantation.
2. to implant or transplant such tissue. See also flap (1), grafting, allograft, xenograft.

autodermic graft, autoepidermic graft
a skin graft taken from the patient's own body.
autologous graft, autoplastic graft
a graft taken from another area of the patient's own body; an autograft.
avascular graft
a graft of tissue in which not even transient vascularization is achieved.
graft bed
site to which a graft is to be joined.
bone graft
the transfer of living bone, usually for fracture repair or reconstructive surgery. Various types of bone grafts are identified, depending on their source and treatment, if any, e.g. cortical, autograft, allograft, cancellous, xenograft, isograft.
cable graft
a nerve graft made up of several sections of nerve in the manner of a cable.
chess-board graft
see stamp graft (below).
cutis graft
dermal graft.
dermal graft, dermic graft
skin from which epidermis and subcutaneous fat have been removed, used instead of fascia in various plastic procedures.
graft enhancement
prior exposure of the recipient to the donor's tissues may prolong survival of a graft.
epidermal graft
a piece of epidermis implanted on a raw surface.
fascia graft
a graft of tissue taken from the external investing fascia of the leg (fascia lata).
fascicular graft
a nerve graft in which bundles of nerve fibers are approximated and sutured separately.
free graft
a graft of tissue completely freed from its bed, in contrast to a flap.
full-thickness graft
a skin graft consisting of the full thickness of the skin, with little or none of the subcutaneous tissue.
heterodermic graft
heterologous graft, heteroplastic graft
a graft of tissue transplanted between animals of different species; a heterograft or xenograft.
homologous graft
a graft of tissue obtained from the body of another animal of the same species but with a genotype differing from that of the recipient; a homograft or allograft.
isologous graft, isoplastic graft
a graft of tissue transplanted between genetically identical individuals; an isograft.
lamellar graft
replacement of the superficial layers of an opaque cornea by a thin layer of clear cornea from a donor eye.
mesh graft
skin grafts in which multiple small incisions have been made to permit lateral stretching of the graft and to increase flexibility to facilitate placement in tricky sites.
Enlarge picture
Mesh graft. By permission from Slatter D, Textbookof Small Animal Surgery, Saunders, 2002
omental g's
free or attached segments of omentum used to cover suture lines following gastrointestinal or colonic surgery.
patch graft
used in the surgical repair of tissue defects of the esophagus and to enlarge the pulmonary outflow tract. In-lay patches replace missing tissue. On-lay patches reinforce existing tissue.
pedicle graft
a portion of skin and subcutaneous tissue with a vascular attachment moved from one part of the body to another. Grafted to the new site, they not only can survive because of their own vascular supply, they can improve circulation in the site. Called also pedicle flap.
penetrating graft
a full-thickness corneal transplant.
periosteal graft
a piece of periosteum to cover a denuded bone.
pinch graft
a piece of skin graft about 6 mm in diameter, obtained by elevating the skin with a needle and slicing it off with a knife.
punch graft
grafts are obtained by using a skin biopsy punch on the animal or on a piece of separated skin.
graft rejection
seed graft
small pieces of skin are imbedded in granulation tissue on the same patient.
sieve graft
a skin graft from which tiny circular islands of skin are removed so that a larger denuded area can be covered, the sievelike portion being placed over one area, and the individual islands over surrounding or other denuded areas.
skin graft
a piece of skin implanted to replace a lost part of the integument. Many types of graft are used and are included in this list.
split-skin graft
a skin graft consisting of only a portion of the skin thickness.
sponge graft
a bit of sponge inserted into a wound to promote the formation of granulations.
stamp graft
squares of split-thickness or full-thickness skin are placed on a bed of granulation tissue.
thick-split graft
a skin graft cut in pieces, often including about two-thirds of the full thickness of the skin.
tubed graft
see rope flap.
tunnel graft
see rope flap.
vascular graft
see vascular conduit.
References in periodicals archive ?
At this first follow-up visit, the silk strips are removed and the skin grafts are examined.
Michelle, mum to a four-year-old boy and a 12-year-old girl, was given morphine to reduce the pain, and was treated for any possible infection before plastic surgeons could even consider carrying out skin grafts.
At procurement, 22 out of 30 cadaver skin grafts were viable (73.
In the past, these wounds have been treated with repeated serial debridements and painful dressing changes with the eventual placement of split thickness skin grafts (STSG) on compromised tissues.
I'm scarred for life either way - if I have the skin graft I'll have two scars - one on my neck and another on my leg.
A team of plastic surgeons from Nagoya University and a venture company in Gamagori, Aichi Prefecture, are engaged in joint research aimed at what would be the country's first sales of skin grafts, university team members said Friday.
more transplantable skin grafts that are used to treat severely burned patients and individuals requiring reconstructive surgery due to trauma or disease.
We report the cases of 2 patients with EAC cholesteatoma who were treated with an inferior canal wall reconstruction technique that involved the placement of a pedicled musculoperiosteal flap, a cartilage graft, and a full-thickness skin graft.
The court was told she had significant scarring which represented a severe cosmetic disability at the site of the injury and at the site of the skin graft.
John Neary, 18, from Runcorn, will need two years of skin graft surgery to rebuild his right ear, which was bitten off during an assault at Mr Smith's nightclub in Warrington.
The unique ability to "micro-morselize" a very small skin graft with the proprietary XPANSION[R] System delivers wound site coverage of up to 100 times the size of the donor site graft.