skills for life


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skills for life

An NHS phrase referring to its support of a culture of lifelong learning amongst its workers at all levels, especially in regards to literacy (reading and writing) and numeracy, but also study skills, problem-solving and communications skills (listening, speaking), and even social skills.
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7 million adults have improved their skills on over 12 million courses between the launch of the strategy in 2001and July 2007, with 2,276,000 learners achieving their first Skills for Life qualification in literacy, language or numeracy.
Once people get the taste for learning in the right environment, with the right support, evidence shows they continue learning beyond the initial skills for life qualifications.
Senior business leaders have also joined the campaign's Employer Champions Network, committing to act as ambassadors for Skills for Life, and inspiring peers, suppliers and clients into action.
The Government's Skills for Life strategy was introduced to address the need for better literacy and numeracy education among adults.
And 100,000 of those whose basic skills in reading, writing and communication were below par have enrolled on Skills for Life programmes, an increase of 8,500 on 2004-05.
Sue Henderson, (Responsible for Quality and Training, Skills for Life Strategy Unit, DfES), alongside leading figures from Solihull College, the John Lewis partnership, the LSC and ofcourse the learners, gathered in the centre from 12.
David approached Northumberland Training Agency (NTA), which helped him to work towards a Skills for Life Literacy qualification at level one.
The college was also celebrating an award for its Friday Morning Skills For Life group, which has seen people from a variety of backgrounds come together to improve literacy skills.
A core element of Train to Gain will be an offer of fully funded Skills for Life and first Level 2 National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs).
The new certificate, called ESOL Skills for Life, will reflect the use of English in everyday life ranging from work and housing to buying goods.
Yet despite the evidence, most 16 to 65-year-olds think they have at least a fairly good head for figures and can read fluently, the Skills for Life survey showed.
He was helped by his Jobcentre Plus adviser who recommended he sign up for some Skills for Life training, funded by the Learning and Skills Council (LSC) North East and run by Van Hee Training in Gateshead as part of its learndirect contract.
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