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scald

 [skawld]
a burn caused by a hot liquid or a hot, moist vapor; to burn in such fashion.

scald

(skawld),
1. To burn by contact with a hot liquid or steam.
2. The lesion resulting from such contact.
[L. excaldo, to wash in hot water]

scald

(skawld) to burn with hot liquid or steam; a burn so produced.

scald

[skôld]
Etymology: L, calidus, hot
a burn caused by exposure of the skin to a hot liquid or vapor.

scald

(skawld)
1. To burn by contact with a hot liquid or steam.
2. The lesion resulting from such contact.
[L. excaldo, to wash in hot water]

scald

A burn caused by hot liquid or steam.

scald

tissue damage caused by applied wet heat (e.g. hot water, steam); unconscious scalding of feet and subsequent blistering/ulceration are associated with marked distal sensory neuropathy

scald

1. a burn caused by a hot liquid or a hot, moist vapor; to burn in such fashion.
2. see benign footrot.
3. alopecia, pityriasis and hair loss over the rump of the horse without dermatitis; occurs in warm wet weather when the skin is wet continuously for long periods.

milk scald
see milk scald.
sheep scald
see interdigital dermatitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recipe a lamprey & sla hym with wyne & salt, & skald hym in wature & salt, & cut a lityl at pe navyll & take oute pe gut & pe eyghener, & kepe pe blode; pan rost hym on a spyt, & kepe wele pe grece; pan grind rasyns o[f] curans & draw pam vp with whyte wyne & vynegre & with crusts of brede, & do perto powder of gynger & of galyngale, floure of rice, powdyr of canell, crows & macis, & ras[yns of] corance hole, with pe blode & grece of pe lamprey.
The faces of Orkney: stones, skalds and saints: 128-37.
With a major international project under way to re-edit the entire corpus ascribed to skalds from the ninth to fourteenth centuries, skaldic verse is enjoying an unprecedented surge of scholarly interest.
The Icelandic landscape, the seasons, wildlife, rivers, glaciers, and streams of an ancient land, and the skalds and poets of the past, all figure importantly in Stigar.
xlix; Regina Psaki on women's counsel in Parcevals saga; Forrest Scott on Eyrbyggja saga; Kerry Shea on the absenting of women in 'Bisclaretz ljod'; Sandra Ballif Straubharr on the skalds Jorunn, Audr, and Steinunn; Karen Swenson on Havamal, Porunn Sigurdardottir on women farmers in nineteenth-century Iceland.