situation

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sit·u·a·tion

(sich-yū-ā'shŭn),
The aggregate of biologic, psychological, and sociologic factors that affect a person's behavioral pattern.

situation

1. A set of circumstances.
2. The location of an entity in relation to other objects.
References in classic literature ?
The schoolhouse stood in a rather lonely but pleasant situation, just at the foot of a woody hill, with a brook running close by, and a formidable birch-tree growing at one end of it.
is desirous of meeting with a situation in a private family where the children are under fourteen (I thought that as I was barely eighteen, it would not do to undertake the guidance of pupils nearer my own age).
Here the stage artifice of the situation presented difficulties which Magdalen had not encountered in the first scene -- and here, her total want of experience led her into more than one palpable mistake.
To employ the jargon of the day, is there not a singular drama in the situation of these four personages?
We told each other everything, our perils, our great joys, our little pleasures, and even the humors of the situation.
Moreover, it is upon such situations that the issues of good or bad fortune will depend.
There are situations which the heart of a father or a mother cannot be made to understand.
In hemmed-in situations, you must resort to stratagem.
They accord with the nature of such scenery, and add much to its romantic effect; bounding like goats from crag to crag, often trooping along the lofty shelves of the mountains, under the guidance of some venerable patriarch with horns twisted lower than his muzzle, and sometimes peering over the edge of a precipice, so high that they appear scarce bigger than crows; indeed, it seems a pleasure to them to seek the most rugged and frightful situations, doubtless from a feeling of security.
Very true, my love," said Miss Emmerson, excessively gratified to hear her niece praise the youth; "it is the surest test of courage when men behave with presence of mind in novel situations.
Anne had no Uppercross Hall before her, no landed estate, no headship of a family; and if they could but keep Captain Wentworth from being made a baronet, she would not change situations with Anne.
The plays are light and amusing transcripts from life, for the most part, and where at times they deepen into powerful situations, or express strong emotions, they do so with persons so little different from the average of our acquaintance that we do not remember just who the persons are.