situational theory

situational theory

a leadership theory in which the manager chooses a leadership style to match a particular situation.
References in periodicals archive ?
For decades, public relations scholars have employed the situational theory of publics to segment audiences and to predict information seeking and processing activities (Aldoory & Sha, 2007; Grunig, 1997).
put forward their situational theory in 1992, in which they proposed that job satisfaction is defined by two kinds of variables: situational characteristics' and situational occurrences'.
According to Horner (1997), the situational theory represents a type of leadership which depends on the factors of leader, follower and work situation.
There are a number of theories (among these are: major human theory, the theory of specific driver characteristics, driving styles theory, situational theory, etc.
Four other types of theories dealing with poverty are Social Darwinian Theory of Poverty, Culture of Poverty, Situational Theory of Poverty, and Structural Theory of Poverty.
Moreover, according to situational theory of publics, publics arise when individuals face a similar problem, recognize the problem, and organize to resolve the problem (Grunig, 1983).
One famous situational theory is that of Fiedler (1967) who after 15 year programme of research established the situational theory is the correct one.
He addresses classic and contemporary conflict theory and conflict resolution, situational theory, the theory and methods of small groups, the urban middleman, and post-modern theories on evil in light of 9/11, he confronts the media in their interpretation, and he takes on the ways in which technology and people are and are not affected by what sociology can teach about business, politics, and social issues.
Ultimately, an administrative training course that utilized an Image Repair Situational Theory was developed.
Some of the more significant theorists and their models include: House's (1971) path-goal theory, Yukl's (1971) multiple-linkage model, Vroom and Yetton's (1973) decision-making theory, Hersey and Blanchard's (1977) situational theory, and Kerr and Jermier's (1978) leader substitutes theory.
Fiedler, a well-known and earliest advocate of situational theory, further elaborated his propositions in the form of contingency theory.