siphon

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siphon

 [si´fon]
1. a bent tube with arms of unequal length, for drawing liquid from a higher to a lower level by force of atmospheric pressure.
2. to draw liquid by means of a siphon.

si·phon

(sī'fŏn),
A tube bent into two unequal lengths, used to remove fluid from a cavity or vessel by atmospheric pressure.
[G. siphōn, tube]

siphon

/si·phon/ (si´fun) a bent tube with two arms of unequal length, used to transfer liquids from a higher to a lower level by the force of atmospheric pressure.

siphon

also

syphon

(sī′fən)
n.
1. A tube that carries a liquid from a higher level up and over a barrier and then down to a lower level, with the flow maintained by gravity and atmospheric pressure as long as the tube remains filled.
2. Zoology A tubular organ, especially of aquatic invertebrates such as squids or clams, by which water is taken in or expelled.
v. si·phoned, si·phoning, si·phons
v.tr.
To draw off or convey (a liquid) through a siphon.

si′phon·al, si·phon′ic adj.

si·phon

(sī'fŏn)
A tube bent into two unequal lengths, used to remove fluid from a cavity or vessel by atmospheric pressure and gravity.
[G. siphōn, tube]

siphon

a structure occurring in molluscs through which water is drawn in and out of the mantle cavity and which in some is used to create a jet to propel the animal through the water.

siphon

1. a bent tube with arms of unequal length, for drawing liquid from a higher to a lower level by force of atmospheric pressure.
2. to draw liquid by means of a siphon.
References in periodicals archive ?
An attorney investigating a siphoning case must determine the location of the break in the fuel line, the fluid level in the tank, and the orientation of the vehicle at the crash scene.
Juries have been highly receptive to plaintiffs' claims of siphoning defects.
Siphoning cases are so successful for three primary reasons.
Some current vehicle components--including fuel pumps, reservoirs, and filters--incorporate valves that will prevent siphoning if there is a break in the fuel line.
The automotive industry has known for many years that siphoning can contribute to post-collision fires.
GM engineers discussed several "solutions" to prevent siphoning after it was discovered that a car siphoned fuel from its tank in a 50-mph crash test into a pole.
GM continued to discuss the siphoning problem in the mid-1980s, but it incorporated safety features into only a few of its models.
GM experts testifying in court have consistently denied that siphoning can occur in a collision.
Siphoning is a common occurrence if no safety features are incorporated into the fuel system.
The early patents discuss "flapper valves," which were originally designed to prevent intentional siphoning of gas from the tank.
The oil siphoning operations "will take more than a week," according to Balilo.