siphon

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siphon

 [si´fon]
1. a bent tube with arms of unequal length, for drawing liquid from a higher to a lower level by force of atmospheric pressure.
2. to draw liquid by means of a siphon.

si·phon

(sī'fŏn),
A tube bent into two unequal lengths, used to remove fluid from a cavity or vessel by atmospheric pressure.
[G. siphōn, tube]

siphon

/si·phon/ (si´fun) a bent tube with two arms of unequal length, used to transfer liquids from a higher to a lower level by the force of atmospheric pressure.

siphon

also

syphon

(sī′fən)
n.
1. A tube that carries a liquid from a higher level up and over a barrier and then down to a lower level, with the flow maintained by gravity and atmospheric pressure as long as the tube remains filled.
2. Zoology A tubular organ, especially of aquatic invertebrates such as squids or clams, by which water is taken in or expelled.
v. si·phoned, si·phoning, si·phons
v.tr.
To draw off or convey (a liquid) through a siphon.

si′phon·al, si·phon′ic adj.

si·phon

(sī'fŏn)
A tube bent into two unequal lengths, used to remove fluid from a cavity or vessel by atmospheric pressure and gravity.
[G. siphōn, tube]

siphon

a structure occurring in molluscs through which water is drawn in and out of the mantle cavity and which in some is used to create a jet to propel the animal through the water.

siphon

1. a bent tube with arms of unequal length, for drawing liquid from a higher to a lower level by force of atmospheric pressure.
2. to draw liquid by means of a siphon.
References in periodicals archive ?
39; whorls convex, not shouldered, subsutural region concave and sloping, suture not undulating, base of last whorl constricted above rostrum into a deeply concave "waist"; rostrum forming a strongly convex fasciole; aperture narrowly elliptical; siphonal canal strongly contracted but expanded terminally, end truncate, in dorsal view concave, with a slight projection medially.
Jorgensen and Ockelmann (1991) suggested there is a coordination of activity of the lateral cilia of the gill (ctenidium) with the adductor and retractor muscles, as well as, the exhalant siphonal sphincter.
Wild whelks (n > 100, shell length [SL, maximum dimension from the spire to the end of the siphonal canal] range 34-165 mm) had been at VIMS since at least July 2007.
Individuals were measured for shell length (SL, maximum distance from the spire to the end of the siphonal canal) to the nearest millimeter with a measuring board.