sinusoidal obstruction syndrome

sinusoidal obstruction syndrome

,

SOS.

A disruption in the normal flow of venous blood from the sinusoids of the liver and the hepatic venules. It occurs primarily after hematopoietic ("stem") cell transplantation and is characterized by enlargement of the liver, right upper quadrant pain, jaundice, and massive fluid retention in the peritoneum (ascites) within the first three weeks after transplantation. It was formerly known as veno-occlusive disease of the liver.
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labeling for BESPONSA includes a boxed warning for hepatotoxicity, including hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), also known as sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), and increased risk of post-HSCT non-relapse mortality.
A third type of hepatic outflow impairment, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (previously termed veno-occlusive disease), occurs when the hepatic sinusoids or central veins become obstructed.
We did not search for cases of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, because of its aforementioned characteristic histologic findings and distinctive clinical setting.
Of note are the similarities between clinical findings in patients with DENV infection and sinusoidal obstruction syndrome such as hepatomegaly, ascites, right pleural effusion, swelling of the gall bladder wall, and decreased velocity or reversed direction of portal blood flow (10).
Review article: updates in the pathogenesis and therapy of hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome.
Individualized therapeutic drug monitoring must be performed to ensure that busulfan concentrations are optimal for treatment and to reduce the risk for graft rejection, disease relapse, and sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), previously known as veno-occlusive disease.
Infections, drug toxicity, the sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) and acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) are the most frequent causes of liver abnormalities in the early post-transplant period.
Hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), a serious complication that can occur following either allogeneic or autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), was described by Tracy Krimmel, MSN, AOCN[R], APRN-BC, and Loretta A.
Because the sinusoidal lesions were similar to those seen in veno-occlusive disease, also termed sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, the authors gave the name of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) to these vascular lesions.
AMEX:GNT) (the "Company") today reported that an independent study of Defibrotide was the subject of a published paper titled "Successful Treatment with Defibrotide for Sinusoidal Obstruction Syndrome (also known as Veno-Occlusive Disease or "VOD") after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (SCT)," which appeared in the December 2005 issue of Kobe Journal of Medical Science.
The data showed that defibrotide use in patients with hepatic veno-occlusive (VOD), also called as sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), with multi-organ failure (MOF) post-hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) was linked with a statistically essential enhancement in Day +100 survival and in rate of complete response (CR) by Day +100, in comparison with rigorously chosen historical controls.
Patients with alcoholic hepatitis (23) and sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (24) occurring in the setting of severe cellular rejection post liver transplant can have similar lesions and can also have noncirrhotic portal hypertension.