sinus arrhythmia


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Related to sinus arrhythmia: Sinus tachycardia

arrhythmia

 [ah-rith´me-ah]
variation from the normal rhythm, especially of the heartbeat; see also dysrhythmia. adj., adj arrhyth´mic.
sinus arrhythmia the physiologic cyclic variation in heart rate, originating in the sinoatrial node and related to vagal impulses to the node; it occurs commonly in children (juvenile arrhythmia) and in the aged.

si·nus ar·rhyth·mi·a

rhythmic, repetitive irregularity of the heartbeat, the heart being under the control of its normal pacemaker, the sinuatrial node.
Synonym(s): juvenile arrhythmia

sinus arrhythmia

an irregular cardiac rhythm in which the heart rate usually increases during inspiration and decreases during expiration. It is common in children and young adults and has no clinical significance except in elderly patients.

si·nus ar·rhyth·mi·a

(sī'nŭs ă-ridh'mē-ă)
A cyclic variation in heart rate, usually normal and linked to respiratory movements.

arrhythmia

variation from the normal rhythm, especially of the heartbeat. See also bradycardia, tachycardia.

atrial arrhythmia
see atrial flutter, atrial fibrillation.
bradycardic arrhythmia
benign arrhythmia
one which is clinically insignificant.
cardiac arrhythmia
irregularity of the normal heart rhythm, either in frequency or amplitude, or almost always both.
exercise-induced arrhythmia
a cause of poor racing performance or sudden death while racing; detectable only by telemetered electrocardiography.
sinus arrhythmia
the physiological cyclic variation in heart rate related to vagal impulses to the sinoatrial node.
supraventricular a's
see sinoatrial arrest, atrial tachycardia, supraventricular tachycardia, atrial fibrillation.
ventricular a's
see premature heartbeats, ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The following day there was sinus rhythm with marked sinus arrhythmia and P waves indicating left atrial enlargement.
The sinus arrhythmia may not only facilitate the intermittent isorhythmic atrioventricular dissociation, but may be a consequence of it.
The electrocardiogram (Figure 1) displays sinus arrhythmia with normal P waves.
Ventriculophasic sinus arrhythmia is seen in up to 40% of cases of complete atrioventricular block and has been described in second-degree atrioventricular block, with ventricular premature complexes, and in pacemaker-induced ventricular rhythm (3-6).