silicon chip

(redirected from silicon chips)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to silicon chips: microprocessor chip

silicon chip

A wafer of silicon with transistors and electronic microcircuitry etched on its surface, forming the highway on which data travels in a microprocessor.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
IBM's breakthrough enables the integration of different optical components side-by-side with electrical circuits on a single silicon chip using sub-100nm semiconductor technology.
This is a small but important step on the path towards the long-term goal of many scientists and medical experts, which is to develop surgical implants by using silicon chips," the Scotsman quoted Professor Alan Murray, head of the University of Edinburgh's school of engineering and electronics, as saying.
To build its laser, the UCLA team applied microfabrication techniques to a silicon chip to create a wire 2 centimeters long and only micrometers across.
Much of the present wait is due to the silicon chip manufacturers scrambling to make the InfiniBand products.
As soon as the market shows signs of improving, other manufacturers of silicon chips will presumably step up their production to the larger-sized wafer as well.
The core technology that makes these silicon chips unclonable is called Physical Unclonable Functions (PUF).
This grant will help us give silicon chips the ability to learn more from their own big data so they can change their mission to better match the needs of the user," said Shawn Blanton, head of the CSSI and a professor of electrical and computer engineering (ECE) at CMU.
Nevertheless, there is a great deal of development work to do before the new circuits on nanotubes can replace conventional transistor-based silicon chips.
To overcome the challenge posed by optical sensors, manufacturers are encouraging their research units to develop high-end silicon chips to get its scanning level to compete effectively with optical scanners," says Khan.
Cellular computers will probably never rival silicon chips in speed and reliability.
While this is still slower than the speeds obtained by today's silicon chips, the IBM team believes that new nanofabrication processes will eventually unlock the superior performance potential of carbon nanotube electronics.