signpost


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signpost

A term which is most commonly used in the UK as a verb; to point the way, provide direction, guide.
References in periodicals archive ?
An important technique both Joe and Randy employ is to switch out the overhanging branch and replace it with one from a distant rub tree or signpost.
The Signpost Deal Scout program has helped supplement my income, simply by reaching out to businesses where I'm already a loyal customer," said Chris Smith, a Signpost Deal Scout in Lansing, Michigan.
TEAM EFFORT Malcolm Wright, managing director of ITV SignPost.
Signpost successfully won the contract which is valued at more than pounds 1m which has secured 80 jobs and over the four years of the contract's lifetime will mean the opportunity of significant growth for the Arkles Lane company.
But his discussion of historicism epitomizes the extent to which the great strength of the book -- the lightness of touch that enables him to signpost without systematizing -- borders on becoming a weakness.
In 45 years of signpost photography, we can count unpleasant incidents on one hand.
Assuming our current activity rates, Signpost could create a local sales force that will rival any daily deal company or other local marketing business.
In fact, we even can reuse the same hole, simply by replacing the smaller rub tree with a larger signpost tree.
After lifting ATMs of various banks and extorting ornaments from gullible women posing as policemen, they are now busy defacing traffic signposts in the IT capital.
16, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Signpost, the community-driven deal site, unveiled the Signpost Merchant Center, a self-service tool to help local businesses create and distribute pre-paid offers in real-time.
A 35-YEAR-OLD Liverpool man died today after a car overturned and crashed into a signpost on the M62.
Go right before the church and left at the signpost up the track.