significance

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significance

[signif′ikəns]
Etymology: L, significare, to signify
1 in research, the statistical probability that a given finding may have occurred by chance alone. The conventional standard for attributing significance is a finding that occurs fewer than 5 times in 100 by chance alone (p |Ld .05).
2 the importance of a study in developing a practice or theory, as in nursing practice.

significance

Clinical medicine A finding to be weighed in establishing a diagnosis, or influencing management of, a clinical state, which may be expressed as a finding of significance  Statistics A measure of deviation of data from a statistical mean, defined by a probability–p value, where a p of 0.05 indicates a 5% possibility or 1 chance in 20 that a dataset differs from a mean and 19 chances that it will not. See Clinical significance, Statistical significance.

significance

(statistics) a description of an observed result that shows sufficient deviation from the result expected to be considered different from the expected result. Significance tests such as the CHI-SQUARED TEST can be carried out to produce a value that is converted into the probability that an observed result will match the result expected from a theory. In biology there is a convention that, if there is more than a 5% chance (P < 5%) that the observed result is the same as the expected, it is possible to conclude that any deviations are ‘not significant’, i.e. have occurred by chance alone. If, however, there is less than a 5% chance (P < 5%) that observed and expected are the same, then it is concluded that the deviations are ‘significant’, i.e. have not occurred by chance alone. For example, tossing a coin 100 times gives 58 heads and 42 tails. The probability that 58:42 is similar to the expected 50:50 is greater than 5%, thus we can conclude that there is no significant deviation between observed and expected results.

significance 

In statistics, an indication that the results of an investigation on a population (e.g. patients) differ from those of another population (e.g. general) by an amount that could not happen by chance alone. This is evaluated by establishing a significance level, that is the probability, called p value, which leads us to reject or accept the null hypothesis Ho (there is no significant difference between two populations and the difference is attributed to chance) and accept or reject the alternative hypothesis H1 that there is a statistically significant difference between two populations. A p value p < 0.05 is often considered significant, but the lower this figure, the stronger the evidence. See randomized controlled trial.

significance

the quality of an assessment about the relationship between two or more values of a variable. Significance is achieved if the relationship is more common than would be achieved by a random selection.
References in classic literature ?
I sagaciously observed, if it didn't signify to him, to whom did it signify?
I answered in few words, but to no purpose, and made a sign with my hand that was loose, putting it to the other (but over his excellency's head for fear of hurting him or his train) and then to my own head and body, to signify that I desired my liberty.
Note: When I say "sitting", of course I do not mean any change of attitude such as you in Spaceland signify by that word; for as we have no feet, we can no more "sit" nor "stand"(in your sense of the word) than one of your soles or flounders.
Observe that the word "religione" was suffered to stand in the text of the Testina, being used to signify indifferently every shade of belief, as witness "the religion," a phrase inevitably employed to designate the Huguenot heresy.
Expressions which are in no way composite signify substance, quantity, quality, relation, place, time, position, state, action, or affection.
But it does not signify if they do," said Catherine, very innocently.
He was thinking "Here is a new ring in the sound of my name to recommend it in her hearing; however--what does it signify now?
Nor did Bennett Greene, expert in military executions, ever again signify his presence at one.
supposed to signify, in a general way, some kind of rite or ceremony
As to whether the name be real or fictitious, it cannot greatly signify to those who know him only by his works.
Margaret McNeill ALICHEN is a sign of good clean air - it doesn't cause any damage so that's not the Lichen |c an signify reason your trees aren't thriving.
WHERE grey hair in a man seems to signify power, experience and respect, in a woman it says she has finished her useful life as breeding material and is best left to her own devices - and ignored.