significance

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significance

[signif′ikəns]
Etymology: L, significare, to signify
1 in research, the statistical probability that a given finding may have occurred by chance alone. The conventional standard for attributing significance is a finding that occurs fewer than 5 times in 100 by chance alone (p |Ld .05).
2 the importance of a study in developing a practice or theory, as in nursing practice.

significance

Clinical medicine A finding to be weighed in establishing a diagnosis, or influencing management of, a clinical state, which may be expressed as a finding of significance  Statistics A measure of deviation of data from a statistical mean, defined by a probability–p value, where a p of 0.05 indicates a 5% possibility or 1 chance in 20 that a dataset differs from a mean and 19 chances that it will not. See Clinical significance, Statistical significance.

significance

(statistics) a description of an observed result that shows sufficient deviation from the result expected to be considered different from the expected result. Significance tests such as the CHI-SQUARED TEST can be carried out to produce a value that is converted into the probability that an observed result will match the result expected from a theory. In biology there is a convention that, if there is more than a 5% chance (P < 5%) that the observed result is the same as the expected, it is possible to conclude that any deviations are ‘not significant’, i.e. have occurred by chance alone. If, however, there is less than a 5% chance (P < 5%) that observed and expected are the same, then it is concluded that the deviations are ‘significant’, i.e. have not occurred by chance alone. For example, tossing a coin 100 times gives 58 heads and 42 tails. The probability that 58:42 is similar to the expected 50:50 is greater than 5%, thus we can conclude that there is no significant deviation between observed and expected results.

significance 

In statistics, an indication that the results of an investigation on a population (e.g. patients) differ from those of another population (e.g. general) by an amount that could not happen by chance alone. This is evaluated by establishing a significance level, that is the probability, called p value, which leads us to reject or accept the null hypothesis Ho (there is no significant difference between two populations and the difference is attributed to chance) and accept or reject the alternative hypothesis H1 that there is a statistically significant difference between two populations. A p value p < 0.05 is often considered significant, but the lower this figure, the stronger the evidence. See randomized controlled trial.

significance

the quality of an assessment about the relationship between two or more values of a variable. Significance is achieved if the relationship is more common than would be achieved by a random selection.
References in periodicals archive ?
We are pleased with validation from RSA that places Signify as a certified managed service provider of secure access solutions to the European market," said Dave Abraham, CEO at Signify.
Users reportedly receive a small RSA SecurID token from Signify, which produces a new one-time passcode every 60 seconds.
While twenty-seven diverse essayists invoking many of the same forces and figures is a profound testament to the magnitude of the African continuum, there are myriad contributing deities and forces that uniquely signify, complicate, and elucidate, and they await re-membering.
directs someone unseen on how to position a large canvas (brushy, to signify "painting") or maybe how to maneuver it out the door.
Traditional New Year's food includes steamed dumplings, which look like gold and mean prosperity; fish, which represents fortune and prosperity; sweet rice cakes (on New Year's Day morning), which signify long life; and vegetables.
The new name of the product was carefully chosen as a departure from the long-standing KODAK Picture Maker identity to signify that these new machines do much more than previous generations.
Massood notes importantly that the central trope in these films is movement and confinement, and she stresses that movement and mobility did not signify leaving the ghetto; rather, they meant change and transformation of the ghetto space.
Examples of such statements include the statement that our revenue growth from 2000 through 2004 may signify an expanding role and acceptance of solid-state nuclear medicine technology, as well as an increasing demand and benefits of portable in-office nuclear services for cardiology; our long term performance; our prospects for future revenue growth; and any plans for increasing market penetration in the portable in-office nuclear medicine business.
As a revolutionary martyr Marat was seized upon by David to signify an unprecedented entity in French painting: a republican body politic.
Numbers can signify different meanings in various cultures.
8) Ellison's tropes of invisibility, the Cyclops, spooks, magic, and whiteness, then, signify multiply in terms of the Invisible Man's dual sense of invisibility and in the implied oppositions to right-wing AngloSaxonism that is invoked by continual narrative allusions to lynching.
Red roses are the traditional Valentine's Day choice, because they signify true love, say florists.