sigh

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sigh

 [si]
1. a long, audible exhalation.
2. an intermittent inflation of the lungs with a large volume from a mechanical ventilator; this is essentially a deep breath that is incorporated into the ventilation cycle. The use of large tidal volumes has replaced the use of the sigh in many settings.

sigh

(),
1. An audible inspiration and expiration under the influence of some emotion.
2. To perform such an act.
[A.S. sīcan]

sigh

sigh

Respiratory medicine
A breath occurring at regular (predictable) intervals, possibly in response to a slow decrease in lung compliance, which is seen when constant ventilation is maintained; sighs tend to be followed by smaller than normal breaths.
 
Vox populi
A deep exhalation of breath, typically with an overtone of sadness or wistfulness.

sigh

Augmented breath Pulmonology A breath occurring at regular–predictable intervals, possibly in response to the slow ↓ in lung compliance seen when constant ventilation is maintained; sighs tend to be followed by smaller than normal breaths. Cf Noisy breathing.

sigh

()
1. An audible inspiration and expiration under the influence of some emotion.
2. To perform such an act.
[A.S. sīcan]

sigh (sī),

n an audible and prolonged inspiration followed by a shortened expiration.

sigh

complementary breathing cycles characterized by a quick, deep inspiration followed by a slower expiration; probably a compensatory mechanism to counter poor ventilation.
References in periodicals archive ?
This eclectic anthology ranges from the practical, as in "Maneuvering Through Menopause: A Rite of Passage" in which two doctors decode the change of life, to the poetic "To My Last Period" in which Lucille Clifton bids farewell to an old friend: "now it is done, and I feel just like the grandmothers who, after the hussy has gone, sit holding her photograph sighing, wasn't she beautiful?
The same network can generate normal breathing, gasping and sighing," he says.
If we read the sonnet as a female subject's response to the wistful question that Tyard's male subject posed to his lute ("does there remain in her bosom any sighing memory of me?