sickroom


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sickroom

(sĭk′ro͞om′, -ro͝om′)
n.
A room occupied by a sick person.
References in periodicals archive ?
The next transpositions between Milla's sickroom hunger for her maps in the present and the violence of her experiences in the past are particularly striking.
She confessed that she hadn't dared enter the sickroom .
When the alphabet is brought into the sickroom Milla, knowing that she can lose the limited power to communicate at any moment, realises that this is her "last chance" (438).
Coming just after Maria Elizabeth's depiction of Robinson's pouring forth poems in the sickroom, the episode becomes an almost pantomimic scene of unintentional authorship, where a powerful editor discovers hidden poetic genius and gallantly publishes spoken improvisation as lasting art.
The narrator even makes sure that we notice that he takes off his shoes upon entering the sickroom.
Seeming almost to explicate this allegorical reading of "Goblin Market" 20 years before the poem's composition, Ellis argued that the "social duties" of women find their highest expression not "in the mart, the exchange, or the public assembly" (Damrosch 2006, 1631), but in the sickroom, tending with disinterested kindness to their husbands and children.
45) In that poem the shoulders are not those of the living, straining to carry from the sickroom the dead weight, but those of the dead who still carry the burdens and the deadly dialectics of the living: 'The hunter still followed/Airy victims, and labour/Afflicted even here the cramped shoulders--/The habit of distresss'.
Once she has taken us into Bennett's makeshift sickroom, Tyler shows us that both the geologist and his maid must contend with life-threatening hazards, and that the fate of each may rest in the hands of the other.
Jesus is "a bright and morning star," "water in dry places," "the lily of the valley," "the rose of Sharon," "a friend to the friendless," "a rock in a weary land," "a lawyer in the court," "a doctor in the sickroom," and a whole host of such phrases from the essence of their belief in and about the divine and their situation that begins with an assumption of their worth and redemption.
By journeying to this "House of Blessing," Barker severed herself from deep-seated modes of believing and behaving that she had been unable to relinquish while remaining confined to her sickroom.
The National Gallery displays the astonishing paintings of Edvard Munch (pronounced Moonk) -- not only the famous ``Scream,'' but some touching portraits, one called ``Madonna,'' another ``Puberty,'' and two that were scenes from a sickroom, perhaps that of his sister.
He quickly recounted how he had spent the morning in the sickroom, where he had been daubed with iodine and wrapped in bandages by the school nurse, until he had been allowed to go home early accompanied by another boy.