sickly

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Related to sickliness: silliness

sickly

(sĭk′lē)
adj. sick·lier, sick·liest
1. Prone to sickness.
2. Of, caused by, or associated with sickness: a sickly pallor.
3. Conducive to sickness: a sickly climate.
4. Causing nausea; nauseating.

sick′li·ness n.
sick′ly, sick′li·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jeronymo's sickliness and debility further reinforce Sir Charles's image of strength and health.
This energetically written and admirably researched study of the representation of sickliness in German women's narratives before 1914 significantly extends recent critical explorations of discourses of the body, of female pathology and death, by Elisabeth Bronfen, Judith Butler, and others.
Moreover, at several points in the text, Jake describes Cohn's skin as "sallow" possibly alluding to a stereotypic yellowness or sickliness of the Jew's skin (see Gilman 194-209).
For Schlegel, the literary arabesque represents the highest form the Romantic novel can reach, rendering the "degenerate sickliness and prosaic nature of the times" into "an artistically ordered chaos of enticing symmetries and contradictions" (Jeness 63).
The powers of Hyde seemed to have grown with the sickliness of Jekyll" In other words, if you practice evil, you become evil.
Drunk neat or with ice, it is a light and refreshing spirit which lacks the sickliness of other orange liqueurs.
A sliced loaf in waxed paper would disappear in the blink of an eye as from these meagre ingredients sandwiches were made -sugar pieces, they called them and when I was given one I was almost sick with the crunchy sickliness of it.
and then, after this elaborate Georgian sickliness, spare free verse thin and clipped on the page, in imitation of E.
In the forty-five years since Trilling published his essay, critics have steadily reinforced the notion that Fanny's debility is a disturbing force--not by their focus on her sickliness, but through their neglect of it.
A tendency toward sickliness and an insatiable interest in science fiction coalesce in this depiction of the feverish nightmares that come to the bedridden boy.
Europe becomes a symbol of motherhood and immortality: "Her stones, chiseled by the hands of past generations, the swarm of her faces emerging from carved wood, from paintings, from the gilt of embroidered fabrics, soothed one, and my voice was added to her old challenges and oaths in spite of my refusal to accept her split and her sickliness.