sickle

(redirected from sickled)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to sickled: sickle cell, sicklied

sickle

(sĭk′əl)
v. sick·led, sick·ling, sick·les
v.tr.
To deform (a red blood cell) into an abnormal crescent shape.
v.intr.
To assume an abnormal crescent shape. Used of red blood cells.
adj.
Shaped like the blade of a sickle; crescent-shaped: a sickle moon.

sickle (sik´əl),

Patient discussion about sickle

Q. Please precribe for me the possible medicine (treatment) for sickle cells. Secondly, my boy lost hearing at 4 1- I need to know how sickle cells can be treated. 2- My boy just surprisingly lost his abillity to hear anything at the age of 4.

A. wow...you are going through some hard times...it's the hardest thing in the world seeing your children in pain. loosing his hearing could be caused by clots that were formed and destroyed the ear nerve. but it's unlikely it happened in both ears...so i would check it out. and about treatment- there are a variety of treatments, so i found a web site with them all. and even some that are still in research: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/Sca/SCA_Treatments.html

More discussions about sickle
References in periodicals archive ?
Because sickled red cells are often removed from the blood by the spleen, the number of red cells in the body is constantly reduced, producing anaemia.
Abnormally shaped, or sickled, red blood cells get trapped in blood vessels in the lungs of people with the syndrome.
Sickled red blood cells obstruct blood flow and are fragile and prone to bursting, leading to anemia and painful ischemic crises.
Edelstein, who documents the finger-cutting practice in The Sickled Cell (1986, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass.
Patients with sickle cell disease suffer anemia as well as vasoocclusive complications in which sickled red cells, white blood cells and platelets adhere to small vessels blocking blood flow to downstream organs.