sibship


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Related to sibship: proband

sibship

 [sib´ship]
a group of individuals born of the same parents.

sib·ship

(sib'ship),
1. The reciprocal state between individuals who have the same pair of parents.
2. All progeny of one pair of parents.
[A.S. sib, relationship]

sibship

/sib·ship/ (-ship)
1. relationship by blood.
2. a group of persons all descended from a common ancestor.
3. a group of siblings.

sibship

[sib′ship]
Etymology: AS sibb, kin, scieppan, to shape
1 the state of being related by blood.
2 a group of people descended from a common ancestor who are used as a basis for genetic studies.
3 brothers and sisters considered as a group.

sibship

a group of animals born of the same parents.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sibship was estimated in each geoduck group using a full-maximum likelihood model as implemented by Colony v.
Parentage and sibship inference from multi-locus genotype data under polygamy.
Significantly, it produces a full sibship ratio of 10m for Joe (and it shows that Joe and the Crime 1 sample have the same set of Y-STRs).
In a 2007 article, we provided statistical support (based partly on a chi-square test of data assumed to conform to a binomial distribution) for the hypothesis that parental choice (family planning) seems likely to be responsible for more same-sex sibships than unlike-sex sibships in families of two.
This could prove quite fruitful in the ongoing discussions regarding sibship size and resource dilution theory (Steelman et al.
States Oved Yosha 11302 Dalton Conley Parental Educational Investment Rebecca Glauber and Children's Academic Risk: Estimates of the Impact of Sibship Size and Birth Order from Exogenous Variation in Fertility 11303 Jay Bhattacharya The Incidence of the Health- M.
Austen's position in her sibship is significant: she was the second daughter and seventh-born child in a group consisting of one absent and disabled sibling, three big boys studying with her father, and then a nursery of girl, boy, girl, boy.
According to this explanation, the gender of the siblings of the child is important because it is the child's 'reference group', and the child adopts the traits of his/her sibship.
Given the clear linkage between sibship size and resources the number of siblings should have a direct bearing on the age at first motherhood.
A sibship test for linkage in the presence of association: The sib transmission/disequilibrium test.
Effects of environmental history, sibship, and age on predator-avoidance responses of tadpoles.