sibilant


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Related to sibilant: biscuity, boskage, Sibilant sound

sibilant

 [sib´ĭ-lant]
shrill, whistling, or hissing.

sib·i·lant

(sib'i-lănt),
Hissing or whistling in character; denoting a form of rhonchus.
[L. sibilans (-ant-), pres. p. of sibilo, to hiss]

sibilant

/sib·i·lant/ (sib´ĭ-lant) whistling or hissing.

sibilant

[sib′ilənt]
Etymology: L, sibilare, to hiss
a hissing sound or one in which the predominant sound is /s/.

sibilant

adjective Whistling, hissing.

sibilant

Physical exam adjective Whistling, hissing

sib·i·lant

(sib'i-lănt)
Hissing or whistling in character; denoting a form of rhonchus.
[L. sibilans (-ant-), pres. p. of sibilo, to hiss]

sibilant

1. Hissing.
2. A speech sound, such as ‘s’, ‘sh’ or ‘z’.
3. A sibilant consonant.

sib·i·lant

(sib'i-lănt)
Hissing or whistling in character; denoting a form of rhonchus.
[L. sibilans (-ant-), pres. p. of sibilo, to hiss]

sibilant (sib´ilənt),

adj accompanied by a hissing sound; especially a type of fricative speech sound. The phonemes /s/ and /z/ are sibilants.

sibilant

shrill, whistling or hissing.
References in periodicals archive ?
12) The spelling <3> for a voiced sibilant was frequent in the North-West Midland dialect, the same as in the Northern dialect and Scots (Mosse 1952: 8).
Apparently, either te first sibilant or the second was dissimilated due to syllable contraction.
With Audeo YES, we can truly expand audibility, offering people with varying degrees of hearing loss the ability to clearly discern sibilant sounds, which can be so problematic for this group," said Valentin Chapero, Phonak CEO.
05) than pre-implantation scores for three of four components (/pa/,/pi/, and /si/); the difference in scores for the sibilant syllable /sa/ approached but did not quite reach statistical significance (p = 0.
What about little sibilant sounds as when one calls a cat?
A great-grandmother in Opal Moore's "leaving mississippi" teaches children how to spell that "single word story full of sibilant hesitations" (238).
It is argued that assibilations are to be captured in the Optimality Theoretic framework by ranking markedness constraints grounded in perception that penalize sequences like [ti] ahead of a faithfulness constraint that militates against the change from /t/ to some sibilant sound.
We liked the spacious sound, and we liked the way the 901s never seemed to spit the trebles at us the way many of the speakers did (we still recall hearing the early Infinity POS 1 speakers--JAH loves to recount the story of how those were so designated--and being amazed that anyone would think of buying a speaker with such an obnoxious, sibilant, tiresome top end).
And to this seasonal melody we can now add the sibilant tones of the football commentator sucking a menthol lozenge to soothe a throat enraged by too much shouting of, ``That's unbelievable, he's scoredagain
And as any good poet must, Teare also deftly carves out meaning from the rich suggestiveness of sound: "'haus' that sibilant hiss haunts / the end .
Even within these nine references three threads are discernable: three apparently end in the sound /s/, three in the sounds /sk/, and three (moryssh, morysch and morisse) in /sS/, where the capital /S/ represents some additional fricative or sibilant.
The phonological facts pertinent to RS include the following (6): (1) the Italian syllable consists of a nucleus, optional onset, and optional coda; (2) an onset cluster may be two or three consonants; (3) a two-consonant cluster consists of an obstruent followed by a liquid or a sibilant followed by a stop (sdegno); (4) a sibilant preceding an obstruent and a liquid forms a triple cluster (stretto); (5) gemination occurs only intervocalically (dramma) or following a vowel and preceding a liquid (dottrina); (6) a coda can have a maximal cluster of two consonants with first being a liquid or a nasal; and (7) a CV structure is favored.