shoulder

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shoulder

 [shōl´der]
the area around the glenohumeral joint, the large ball-and-socket joint where the humerus joins the scapula. The smooth, rounded head of the humerus rests against the socket in the scapula. The joint is covered by a tough, flexible protective capsule and is heavily reinforced by ligaments that stretch across the joint. The ends of the bones where they meet at the joint are covered with a layer of cartilage that reduces friction and absorbs shock. A thin membrane, the synovial membrane, lines the socket and lubricates the joint with synovia. Further cushioning and lubrication are provided by fluid-filled sacs called bursae. Disorders of the shoulder include bursitis and dislocation.
Coronal section through the shoulder joint.
frozen shoulder popular but misleading name for adhesive capsulitis.

shoul·der

(shōl'dĕr),
1. The lateral portion of the scapular region, where the scapula joins with the clavicle and humerus and is covered by the rounded mass of the deltoid muscle.
2. In dentistry, the ledge formed by the junction of the gingival and axial walls in extracoronal restorative preparations.
[A.S. sculder]

shoulder

/shoul·der/ (shōl´der) the area where the arm joins the trunk and the clavicle meets the scapula.
frozen shoulder  adhesive capsulitis.

shoulder

(shōl′dər)
n.
1.
a. The joint connecting the arm with the torso.
b. The part of the human body between the neck and upper arm.
2.
a. The joint of a vertebrate animal that connects the forelimb to the trunk.
b. The part of an animal near this joint.
3. often shoulders The area of the back from one shoulder to the other.
v. shoul·dered, shoul·dering, shoul·ders

shoulder

Etymology: AS, sculder
the junction of the clavicle, scapula, and humerus where the arm attaches to the trunk of the body.

shoulder

A descriptive term for the gently sloped acceleration rhythm seen on a paper printout of the foetal heart monitor that either precedes or follows a typical deceleration, in contrast to the usual “acceleration” (a short increase in foetal heart rate above baseline) that occurs in response to foetal movement.

'shoulder'

Obstetrics A descriptor for the gently-sloped acceleration rhythm seen on a paper printout of the fetal heart monitor that either precedes or follows a typical deceleration, in contrast to the usual 'acceleration'–a short-term ↑ in heart rate above baseline occurring in response to fetal movement. See Deceleration, Fetal heart monitor.

shoul·der

(shōl'dĕr)
1. The lateral portion of the scapular region, where the scapula joins with the clavicle and humerus and is covered by the rounded mass of the deltoid muscle.
2. Shoulder joint.
3. dentistry The ledge formed by the junction of the gingival and axial walls in extracoronal restorative preparations.
[A.S. sculder]

shoulder

(shol'der)
Enlarge picture
SHOULDER
A part of the shoulder girdle complex, comprising the region of the proximal humerus, clavicle, and scapula. See: scapula; illustration

frozen shoulder

Adhesive capsulitis of shoulder.

shoul·der

(shōl'dĕr)
1. In dentistry, any step formed by junction of gingival and axial walls in extracoronal restorative preparations.
2. Lateral portion of scapular region, where scapula joins with clavicle and humerus and is covered by rounded mass of the deltoid muscle.
[A.S. sculder]

shoulder,

n 1. the junction of the clavicle, scapula, and humerus where the arm attaches to the trunk of the body.
2. in extracoronal cavity preparation of the ledge formed by the meeting of the gingival and axial walls at a right angle.
shoulder, linguogingival,
n the portion of a prepared cavity in the proximal surface of an anterior tooth that is formed by the angular junction of the gingival and lingual walls. Developed to facilitate the dense compaction of gold in this area.

shoulder

the region around the large joint between the humerus and the scapula. The shoulder is a shallow ball-and-socket joint, similar to the hip joint.

shoulder blade
scapula.
shoulder flexion
a fetal postural cause of dystokia; flexion of the shoulder joint results in the affected forelimb, it may be bilateral, is lying back beside the sternum; the shoulder joint prevents entry of the fetus into the pelvic canal.
shoulder joint
scapulohumeral joint.
shoulder luxation
uncommon in most species. Occurs most frequently in dogs and cats associated with trauma.
slipped shoulder
see suprascapular paralysis.
shoulder tick
see ixodesscapularis.

Patient discussion about shoulder

Q. how can i solve my back and shoulder problems? also how can i get raid of my eye bugs?

A. krando,
many thanks i will try those tips you just give me...wish you a wonderful and safe and sound newly year...

Q. shoulder and neck strain and pain I have a terrible shoulder and neck pain and i keep cracking my neck muscles to release pressure. I get temporary relief with tylenol but after few hrs the pain and strain starts again.Any ideas?

A. A mellow exercise and streching on a regular basis is the best way to release a sore back and muscles in general, including your neck. You should try that plus applying local warm temperature (for example a warm pillow)around your neck. If that doesn't work then other anti-inflammatory drugs that you either apply as a cream or take as a pill can help you.

Q. How do I gain range of motion after shoulder surgery I'm 31 years old and had a shoulder replacment last year. I still don't know why my joint gave out and 4 Orthopedic Surgeons couldn't tell me either. I have limited Range of Motion and the Dr. seems to think that because of my "age" I was less likley to get full range back. I refuse to believe that, does anyone have any suggestions on how to gain ROM back?

A. i guess you go to physiotherapy no?
that is their job. to give you range of motion after injuries, surgeries ect. they'll give you exercises specially for your condition. when i had an accident i broke my leg hip and i needed 2 months of physiotherapy that helped very much.

More discussions about shoulder
References in periodicals archive ?
Laura Davis, project coordinator for TimeBank's Shoulder to Shoulder project, added: "We already run a really successful monthly drop-in for veterans and their families and they told us how helpful it would be to have a wide range of information and advice together under one roof.
Delivering the opening remarks of the International Contact Group (ICG) for Afghanistan meeting at Ankara's Hilton Hotel on Friday, Ahmet Davutoglu stated that "Turkey, as an old friend, always gave shoulder to shoulder with Afghanistan.
Why, when our troops fight shoulder to shoulder with the Americans, do they not share the "blue tracker" device our US brothers in arms have?
We pray that God will enable us to fix this building, shoulder to shoulder with everybody in the community.
THE Stuffies are back for a hometown gig in the sweaty surrounds of the Rock CafA, where the faithful will be packed shoulder to shoulder back to the bar and beyond.
Each one spends several months covering science shoulder to shoulder with our more experienced staff members.
In the late 1960s and early '70s, bra-less and still sporting her trendsetting shag cut from Klute, Fonda was ubiquitous, decrying mistreatment of Indians here, standing shoulder to shoulder with migrant workers there, and marching for women's lib elsewhere.
The price of standing shoulder to shoulder appears yet to be unpaid and we, as a region that sends more soldiers to battle than most, will want to know why.
At the conference, Ginn Fourie and Letlapa Mphahlele stood shoulder to shoulder as they told their story of forgiveness and reconciliation.
Shoulder to shoulder, they represented over 90 Boston Marathon finishes: Charles Clark, Sam Paris, and Larry Boies, Jr.
One man stood shoulder to shoulder with the magazine photographer who took that photo, and took some pictures of his own.
Then, even under the scalding fire of criticism, they will have the consolation of knowing that they are noble men--men who can stand shoulder to shoulder with Saint Thomas More, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, and Father John Courtney Murray--brave men who faced the terror of blame rather than betray their principles.