shoulder impingement syndrome

shoulder impingement syndrome

A pain syndrome caused by abrasion of the posterior glenoid rim and the inner rotator cuff (RC), which, with time, is accompanied by bursitis and tendinitis. 

Clinical findings
Posterosuperior impingement affecting the articular surface of RC, which occurs in athletes who have extensive overhead activities (e.g., baseball pitchers) with the joint in extension, abduction and external rotation.

Diagnosis
Physical exam (e.g., testing of range of motion), bone spurs by imaging.

Management
NSAIDs, stretching in a hot shower, steroid injections.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Synera is not approved for the treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) or acute musculoskeletal pain (AMP) in any country and was used in the reported studies on an investigational basis.
10) Repetition and swing flaws can lead to wrist and elbow tendonitis, wrist impaction syndromes, peripheral neuropathies, and shoulder impingement syndrome.
2006) Dynamic sonography evaluation of shoulder impingement syndrome.
Hsu Y, Chen W, Lin H, Wang W and Shih Y (2008): Effects of taping on scapular kinematics and muscle performance in baseball players with shoulder impingement syndrome.
There is other evidence supporting the combined use of manual therapy and exercise in the treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome (Suronkok et al 2009, Senbursa et al 2007).
The second part covers 12 spine-mimicking conditions, including carpal tunnel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and shoulder impingement syndrome.
Neer classification system for shoulder impingement syndrome Stage Description Treatment 1 * reversible inflammation, edema rest, conservative and hemorrhage of the bursa, treatment subacromial space and rotator cuff 2 * irreversible rotator cuff rest, conservative fibrosis and tendinitis treatment, surgery * partial-thickness rotator cuff tear * recurrent pain with activity 3 * partial- or full-thickness surgery rotator cuff tear * bone spurs and excrescences * tendon tear/rupture 4 * rotator cuff tear arthropathy surgery * progressive disability From: Neer (40,41) Table 2.
Incidentally, there's no association between rotator cuff injury or shoulder impingement syndrome and subsequent development of glenohumeral osteoarthritis.
The data was a pooled analysis of two open label pilot studies of Synera in shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) and showed that Synera provided clinically significant improvement of pain and function in SIS.