short-acting


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Related to short-acting: short-acting insulin

short-acting

Etymology: AS, sceort + L, agere, to do
pertaining to or characterizing a therapeutic agent, usually a drug, with a brief period of effectiveness, generally beginning soon after the substance or measure is administered.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lot 3 Short-acting erythropoietins in oncology bail (5% of the original amount of the property (excluding VAT), rounded to the next ten.
7 percent received only short-acting opioids during the period, which is the preferred, first-line treatment.
Their first recommendation--administration of an inhaled short-acting beta-agonist (SABA) before exercise--earns a "strong" recommendation based on "high-quality" evidence.
While it has been known that opioids cause low testosterone in men, this study is the first to show a significant difference in risk between short-acting (immediate release) and long-acting opioids.
Many spacers may have relied on the injectable and other short-acting methods because of lack of availability of reversible long-acting methods, with the IUD often being the only available option.
The exposures evaluated were any prescription in the periconceptional period for a short-acting [beta.
The increased fracture risk was particularly strong during the first 2 weeks after initiation of therapy, when the relative risk was almost sevenfold higher in patients on a short-acting opioid, such as propoxyphene or oxycodone, than in those who were started on a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) or long-acting opioid, including fentanyl or sustained-release hydrocodone.
Step 1: All patients should be prescribed an inhaled short-acting [[beta].
CNS-7056 is a new short-acting general anaesthetic and sedative that acts on GABAA receptors.
It is a short-acting powder form of insulin and many patients would still need long-acting insulin injections.
Gary, who developed Type 1 diabetes when he was 12, controls his condition with a combination of a long-acting basal insulin analogue to control his background insulin levels and a short-acting insulin at mealtimes.
Even though evidence-based guidelines for asthma advocate inhaled corticosteroid therapy, researchers found that only one-fourth of patients received ICS therapy in the year before their emergency room visit, while more than 80% were given rescue medications, with one-third prescribed an oral corticosteroid and over half a short-acting beta agonist.