shop

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Related to shops: H&M

shop

noun A place where a thing is produced and/or displayed and sold.

verb To peruse or purchase wares from an emporium or enterprise.

shop

See Sweatshop, Workshop.
References in classic literature ?
After a moment's pause on the threshold, peering towards the window with her near-sighted scowl, as if frowning down some bitter enemy, she suddenly projected herself into the shop.
If you please, could not guards be placed if only to let us close the shop.
Engaging to call again on the next day, the servant left the shop, and took the way that led back to Vauxhall Walk.
I bought the doll's house, and as they knew the lady's address (it was at this shop that I first learned her name) I instructed them to send it back to her with the following letter, which I wrote in the shop: "Dear madam, don't be ridiculous.
Mont de Piete = traditional term for a municipal pawn shop operated to help the poor}
Mr Wegg, looking back over his shoulder as he pulls the door open by the strap, notices that the movement so shakes the crazy shop, and so shakes a momentary flare out of the candle, as that the babies--Hindoo, African, and British--the 'human warious', the French gentleman, the green glass-eyed cats, the dogs, the ducks, and all the rest of the collection, show for an instant as if paralytically animated; while even poor little Cock Robin at Mr Venus's elbow turns over on his innocent side.
It's true enough," he said, going before us with the lantern, "that they call me the lord chancellor and call my shop Chancery.
They ate them by candle-light after the shop was closed.
Let him stay," said David, with desperate resignation, frightened above all things at the idea of further disturbances in his shop, which would make his exposure all the more conspicuous.
Anthony, as he called them, and a great rabble with them, bringing along with them the true widow that I was pretended to be; and they came sweating and blowing into the shop, and with a great deal of triumph, dragging the poor creature in the most butcherly manner up towards their master, who was in the back shop, and cried out aloud, 'Here's the widow, sir; we have catcher her at last.
He had managed before this to get out of having tea with Dunsford, and, punctually at half past four (he had looked at his watch a dozen times), he went into the shop.
There's your tea; take it away to that box, and drink it there, and make haste, for they'll want you to mind the shop.