shop

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Related to shops: H&M

shop

noun A place where a thing is produced and/or displayed and sold.

verb To peruse or purchase wares from an emporium or enterprise.

shop

See Sweatshop, Workshop.
References in classic literature ?
After a moment's pause on the threshold, peering towards the window with her near-sighted scowl, as if frowning down some bitter enemy, she suddenly projected herself into the shop.
Engaging to call again on the next day, the servant left the shop, and took the way that led back to Vauxhall Walk.
When I had none, I used to look at a venison shop in Fleet Street; or I have strolled, at such a time, as far as Covent Garden Market, and stared at the pineapples.
I went to the place where my shop was, opened it, and received from my fellow-merchants congratulations on my return.
Adrienne took me up and glided from the shop, as if she feared her dear bought prize would yet be torn from her.
Come in through the shop if t'other door's out of order
He was six years younger than Tom, and for a time there was an attempt to utilise him in the green-grocer's shop when Tom at twenty-one married Jessica--who was thirty, and had saved a little money in service.
Wearing a waistcoat over his cotton shirt, Ferapontov was standing before his shop which opened onto the street.
She was carrying an enormous parcel that might have been a bird-cage wrapped in brown paper, and she took it into a bric-a-brac shop and came out without it.
We had not been long out of the shop but the mercer missed his piece of stuff, and sent his messengers, one one way and one another, and they presently seized her that had the piece, with the damask upon her.
Quite unconscious that his master was looking on from the dark corner by the parlour door, Sim threw off the paper cap, sprang from his seat, and in two extraordinary steps, something between skating and minuet dancing, bounded to a washing place at the other end of the shop, and there removed from his face and hands all traces of his previous work--practising the same step all the time with the utmost gravity.
Not, however, towards the 'shops' where cunning artificers work in pearls and diamonds and gold and silver, making their hands so rich, that the enriched water in which they wash them is bought for the refiners;--not towards these does Mr Wegg stump, but towards the poorer shops of small retail traders in commodities to eat and drink and keep folks warm, and of Italian frame-makers, and of barbers, and of brokers, and of dealers in dogs and singing-birds.